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page trail:  Templot Club > Forums > Templot talk > Point blade filing jigs
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             Rating     Point blade filing jigs
     
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1st message | this message only posted: 23 Feb 2011 20:17
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from:
Steve Stubbs
Taunton, Somerset, United Kingdom

 

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Not precisely Templot so apologies;  but does anyone know if there is a 4mm scale point filing jig available on the market?

I have one for 7mm done by the Scaleseven group, but at the moment I file up 4mm and 2mm point blades by hand.    Just starting a 4mm layout with some 24 turnouts and really don't want to have to file all the blades by hand / eye, and the current budget for this does not run to C&L blades.

Steve



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2nd message | this message only posted: 23 Feb 2011 20:23
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from:
polybear
 

 

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They're available from the EMGS - see here (page 10):

http://www.emgs.org/images/stories/Price_List_32Ac_A4.pdf

HTH

Brian

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3rd message | this message only posted: 23 Feb 2011 20:46
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from:
Steve Stubbs
Taunton, Somerset, United Kingdom

 

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Thanks for the fast reply Brian.

The law of SOD of course means it is about the only society I don't belong to!

thanks
Steve
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4th message | this message only posted: 24 Feb 2011 18:29
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from:
Phil O
Plymouth, United Kingdom



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Just go along to an exhibition that they are attending with the trade stand, or Expo EM at Bracknell in May. You won't need membership then.

Cheers Phil

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5th message | this message only posted: 24 Feb 2011 22:03
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from:
Steve Stubbs
Taunton, Somerset, United Kingdom

 

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Great suggestion - thanks

Steve
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6th message | this message only posted: 4 Mar 2011 20:35
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from:
julia
 

 

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polybear wrote:
They're available from the EMGS - see here (page 10):

http://www.emgs.org/images/stories/Price_List_32Ac_A4.pdf

HTH

Brian


This may seem a silly question, but would those jigs work if you were making 16.5mm track rather than 18mm?

J
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7th message | this message only posted: 5 Mar 2011 12:19
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from:
Emma Haywood
United Kingdom

 

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julia wrote:
polybear wrote:
They're available from the EMGS - see here (page 10):

http://www.emgs.org/images/stories/Price_List_32Ac_A4.pdf

HTH

Brian


This may seem a silly question, but would those jigs work if you were making 16.5mm track rather than 18mm?

J


Yes they would work because the blade filing jigs are for 4mm.

The same way that the 7mm filing jigs from the S7 group work for S7, OSF etc etc etc.

Emma
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8th message | this message only posted: 26 Mar 2011 16:59
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from:
Dan6470
 

 

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polybear wrote: They're available from the EMGS - see here (page 10):

http://www.emgs.org/images/stories/Price_List_32Ac_A4.pdf

HTH

Brian
Like Steve, I would also be interested in obtaining a set of jigs but since note 4 on page 10 of the EMGS price list indicates that stocks of the "8790 Crossing V Jig 1:5 1:6 1:7 1:8 have been exhausted and no further supplies are planned. " Is there an alternative supplier?

Dan

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9th message | this message only posted: 26 Mar 2011 17:49
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from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester



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Hi,

I got a crossing V jig from the EMGS stores a few weeks back. There was no mention then of there being any shortage of them although I was only interested in them having one for me of course. It works well on code 75 BH rail.

Rob


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10th message | this message only posted: 26 Mar 2011 19:54
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from:
JFS
United Kingdom

 

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Chaps,

I don't want to be doing the EMGS or anyone else out of business, but come on, it is not beyond the wit of Man to make your own!

Here are some pics of mine - it is just made up of bits of hardwood and brass and is adaptable to make switch tongues (As Bs and Cs) and vees from 1:1 to 1:11 and every fraction in between. I think the principle is fairly self explanatory from the pics, though there are a few little dodges to enable a curved switch to result. One important point for me is the size of my file - it is a 14" bastard cut. I also have a 14" smooth cut for finishing. I am only showing one bit of rail in the pics, but when doing the BACKS of switch tongues you can do three pairs at a time. Obviously, doing the gauge face they can only be done singly if you want to retain a proper foot to the rail. If any one is interested, I can upload some pics of the thing at work.

Needless to say, before you get to it with the file, you grip the thing in a vice at the appropriate angle!

Firstly the Jig set up for switch tongues:-





Notice that the little brass plate at the back not only grips the rail, but also is a guide for the heel of the file - go steady or you file your gauge away!

Secondly, set up for vees



The brass plate still grips the rail, but the bridge piece guides the file. This can be adjusted to any angle.



Another little "point" is that I leave the rail well over length for switches - not only to give plenty to grip on but also to avoid stabbing your hand on the end of it: instead, it just bends out of the way under your fingers.

Best wishes,

Howard.
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11th message | this message only posted: 26 Mar 2011 20:14
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from:
JFS
United Kingdom

 

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... and I should have said, this is for 4mm.

Some of the products here...

http://85a.co.uk/forum/view_topic.php?id=1433&forum_id=6&jump_to=8932#p8932


Howard
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12th message | this message only posted: 26 Mar 2011 21:53
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from:
phileakins
Swanage, United Kingdom

 

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JFS wrote: If any one is interested, I can upload some pics of the thing at work.

Howard.

Yes please Howard - particularly how you keep the foot of the gauge face of the switch.

I am a bit concerned with the use of brass though.  Your pictures show that it is wearing away and however careful you are with a file, it will continue.  Have you tried steel and hardening it?

Phil

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13th message | this message only posted: 26 Mar 2011 22:21
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from:
JFS
United Kingdom

 

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Hi Phil,

I suppose if I were into mass production, then hardened steel would be the way, but I only knocked it up to do a couple of layouts worth! In use, you don't need to put any pressure on the heel of the file. When it does wear, the first move is to turn the brass clamp strip through 180 degrees, then to turn it over and repeat the process - that should keep me going!!! After which, I can make a new clamp strip... You don't really get any wear at the pointy end as the file only touches the rail there. I will try to post a few pics over the next couple of days.

Howard.
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14th message | this message only posted: 27 Mar 2011 14:16
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from:
JFS
United Kingdom

 

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Hello Chaps,

Just a quick update showing how I do Switch Tongues. First a confession, these pics show the use of a little clamp to hold the toe of the tongue: well, I only made it about half an hour ago. Previously, I always used my thumb for this job! In these health and safety conscious days, I thought the pics should show a proper job! (It took me about 10 minutes to make the clamp...)

Firstly, filing the backs of the tongues...

Here are a single pair of rails clamped in the jig - notice that they are "handed" (foot to foot or head to head) and that the extent of the "planing" has been marked with a felt pen (off the Template)



The jig has been set with the clamp in the "B" position



After a few strokes with the bastard cut file, followed by the smooth cut file followed by a rub with 600 grit wet or dry wrapped over the smooth file we end up here



You can see the the metal removal extends just up to the pen mark and that the rail is down to about the mid-way line at the rail tip.

Now for the Guage Faces - here you see my nifty little clamp...

Turn the rail over and re-clamp it at the heel end, the toe end clamp (previously my thumb) just clamps the tip of the switch and only covers the foot of the rail.



In use, we use the file with its Safe Edge against the clamp



It is quite hard to distinguish the rail from the jig in this pic - locate the rail from the red felt pen mark on the rail which again marks the extent of the metal requiring to be removed



Here is the result after a few strokes with the big file - note that again the metal removal extends just into the red mark. When doing the guage face, I don't make use of any guide for the heel end of the file - the brass clamp is too low of course, I have never found this to be a problem, but others could modify the design to deal with this.

Note that this is a STRAIGHT CUT switch: for a curved switch, I trap a scrap of etch waste under the tongue to pack up its middle - crude but effective!

When all that is done, the rail will be "planed" but will taper equally on both sides - to turn it into a switch tongue requires of course that the rail be bent so that the gauge face is straight

You can see that the other tongue is done the same way but obviously using the other side of the jig (you can see the hole for this in the pic).
From this stage, the tongues require a final polish and deburring on the rail top and foot IMPORTANT use only a bit of fine wet or dry for this - NEVER take a file to the top or bottom of a rail!

Here's one I did earlier - I reckon it took less than 10 minutes to do these...



Just one quick thing - a number of people have asked about wear of the jig - I have never found this an issue for the penny numbers of switches we are making (15 pairs for my current opus) A far bigger issue for this jig is that the clamps use wood screws and these need re-plugging from time to time - those who want to take more than half an hour to make their version might resort to nuts and bolts or screws tapped into the brass base strip.

Hope that helps a bit!

Howard.
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15th message | this message only posted: 27 Mar 2011 17:23
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from:
Dan6470
 

 

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Excellent stuff Howard,

Your jigs together with the description of how to use them is very interesting however I have a few questions and wasn't all together sure about asking them for fear of looking a bit daft but what the heck !! Here we go..... You say its not rocket science but its not particularly clear to me probably due to my knowledge of the subject being quite low. To-date I've built, perhaps that should that be attempted to build, one SMP turnout - not a very good result, future construction can only improve ... hopefully:?



1. The brass clamp is in position 'B', so I assume that there are other positions for the type of turnout under construction, A & C? Although I'm not quite sure of the differences between say an A7 turnout and a B7, to date I haven't learnt what the A,B and C refer to .. perhaps somebody can point me towards an explanation. Please confirm if there is an A and C position.

2. For the Vees you have a bridge piece to guide the file, This can be adjusted to any angle! Is this adjustment of the angle achieved by moving the bridge piece according to the numbers on the side of the jig, 4 through 10?

3. What height is the bridge piece?

4. Do you have a drawing of the jig with dimensions that you would be willing to share in order for myself and others to copy. I know its a little cheeky but saves on the "not rocket science" calculations.

Thanks
Dan
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16th message | this message only posted: 27 Mar 2011 18:09
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from:
JFS
United Kingdom

 

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Hi Dan,

All questions are good questions!

In response:-
1. Yes there are A, B and C positions. the effect of moving the brass piece closer to the sharp end is to make the filing angle less acute, hence the "C" position is furthest to the back and the "A" position closest to the front - you can see the spare holes in the pics. I am assuming a basic knowledge of how track is described. To help you with this, I suggest you study the "Vee crossing options" and "Switch options" in Templot's "template" menu. Have a go at creating templates for all of the options and see how the geometry changes. "A" relates to the switch and "7" is the crossing angle- try building an A7 and B7 in Templot and see what happens.

2. In terms of the vee, yes, by sliding the bridge piece along, again the filing angle changes. the numbers along the side indicate the crossing angles but you can set the bridge anywhere, for example if you need a 1:4 1/4.

3. The height of the bridge piece - and all the other dimensions - is not actually that critical, but if you think about how the crossing angle is worked out ie "1 in x" then if the height is say, 10mm above the base, then the marks along the side will be 10mm apart (in principle)

4. I am happy to provide a drawing BUT I would point out that my dimensions are entirely developed from the materials to hand - thus, the thickness of the bit of brass I found in my scrap box dictated the design of the whole thing. What I would therefore prefer to do is to illustrate the rocket science a bit - not least because those more knowledgeable than myself can put me right! I am having my tea now, but perhaps this evening, I will try to knock up a sketch showing the principles.

One thing I must have said a thousand times in this forum is that PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT - do not be afraid of making scrap!!! I knocked up this jig just a few weeks ago because I was starting a new layout and wanted to save a bit of time and beacuse I have become a bit (no, a lot) obsesive about accurate track. But for the past forty years I managed by holding the rail on the bench with my fingers!

In the privacy of your own workshop, just HAVE GO! Grab a bit of rail and a file and let rip - don't worry if the first fifty go in the scrap - each one will be a bit better than the one before and you don't have to use any that you don't like. Just print yourself a Templot Template and you wil be able to see where they are right or wrong!

Hope that helps,

Howard
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17th message | this message only posted: 27 Mar 2011 18:22
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from:
phileakins
Swanage, United Kingdom

 

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Cheers Howard - that helps a lot.

I can spend anything up to an hour on a pair of blades and have resorted to riffler files for the gauge face on the basis that I won't rip my thumb nail to pieces, again.

Lots of food for thought ..... :D

Phil
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18th message | this message only posted: 27 Mar 2011 19:21
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from:
JFS
United Kingdom

 

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Phil,

Buy a file with a "Safe Edge" - they are thumb-friendly! You won't find them in B&Q, find a local specialist tool shop (Greaves, Buck and Hickman etc) or go online and find yourself a mail order supplier. One dodge I used to use for the GF is to hold the rail down with my thumb towards the heel (out of harms way) and to protect the foot with the head of a countersunk woodscrew trapped under my finger.

Howard
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19th message | this message only posted: 28 Mar 2011 08:43
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from:
Dan6470
 

 

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Hi Howard,

Thanks for getting back to me.

JFS wrote: Yes there are A, B and C positions. the effect of moving the brass piece closer to the sharp end is to make the filing angle less acute, hence the "C" position is furthest to the back and the "A" position closest to the front - you can see the spare holes in the pics. I am assuming a basic knowledge of how track is described. To help you with this, I suggest you study the "Vee crossing options" and "Switch options" in Templot's "template" menu. Have a go at creating templates for all of the options and see how the geometry changes. "A" relates to the switch and "7" is the crossing angle- try building an A7 and B7 in Templot and see what happens. Yes of course I must purchase a copy of templot but in the first instance I purchased a SMP kit to see whether I could actually build a turnout and secondly to see if it is something that I will derive pleasure from. There would be little point to purchasing a software that produces beautiful templates if your not going to actually construct them. As I mentioned in my earlier post, my first attempt with the SMP kit was a failure, don't laugh but I'd used the track gauges incorrectly so my 00 turnout is almost TT gauge. Also, I'd made it harder on myself by substituting Peco flat bottom code 100 for the supplied bullhead. I had the idea of connecting the turnout when completed to some Peco track that I've had kicking about since childhood days. You'll recognise that at forty thirteen I'm relatively new to model railways. I'm not in any particular hurry to get track down and trains running but I have it in mind to build my own track and in this regard need to increase my knowledge base. I think I'm okay with the principles behind the terminology for say a  1:6, 1:7 or 1:8. But the A,B and C prefix causes some confusion. I acknowledge that a 'B' switch is larger than an 'A' switch and likewise a 'C' is larger than a 'B', but I don't understand the principles behind this. How are they derived? 

JFS wrote: I am happy to provide a drawing BUT I would point out that my dimensions are entirely developed from the materials to hand - thus, the thickness of the bit of brass I found in my scrap box dictated the design of the whole thing. What I would therefore prefer to do is to illustrate the rocket science a bit - not least because those more knowledgeable than myself can put me right! I am having my tea now, but perhaps this evening, I will try to knock up a sketch showing the principle. I had assumed that the materials had been chosen to fit the design rather than the design fitting the materials. This will of course make a difference, it is unlikely that I will have exactly the same materials to hand as you have, so the principles behind the design would be most welcome. The brass plate is one area that I don't fully understand. I had assumed that the thickness of the brass plate would resolve the angle to file the switch blades but from your photographs you have marked the switch blade with a felt pen and appear to be filing by eye rather than using the brass plate to gain the angle, felt pen mark to the rail web = the angle ...... or am I misunderstanding?

Once again thank you for your response and best regards.
Dan

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20th message | this message only posted: 28 Mar 2011 08:55
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from:
JFS
United Kingdom

 

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... no Dan, you were right, the brass does guide the back of the file and is set to the achieve the correct angle. However, you have to know when you have filed enough away and it is tricky to see if you have filed to about half way through, but you can easily see the progress of filing along the length of the rail.

Hope that clarifies.

Howard.
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21st message | this message only posted: 28 Mar 2011 13:41
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from:
Nigel Brown
 

 

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Interesting stuff. Just shows that there are many approaches to the same problem. Like Howard in his earlier days, I still use the basic approach; rail held flat with one hand on a firm flat surface (usually GW models crossing jig), switch tip at edge of surface, and attack it with any reasonable file to hand, until I get something similar to the switch profile on the template. Works fine; you don't necessarily need any sophisticated tools or jigs. Having said that, if I saw the need for a lot of turnouts coming up, I could be interested in the odd jig.
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from:
allanferguson
Fife, United Kingdom

 

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 In  light  of  recent  discussion  regarding  the  filing  of  crossing  vees  I  thought  I  might  add  my  tuppenceworth.  Attached  is  part  of  a  piece  I  wrote  for  our  own  group  newsletter  a  while  ago.  I'm  sorry,  but  I  don't  know  how  to  convert  it  into  a  document  on  here.

 

Allan  F

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from:
CoBo
North Of The Trent (just), United Kingdom



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allanferguson wrote:  In  light  of  recent  discussion  regarding  the  filing  of  crossing  vees  I  thought  I  might  add  my  tuppenceworth.  Attached  is  part  of  a  piece  I  wrote  for  our  own  group  newsletter  a  while  ago.  I'm  sorry, 
Allan  F
Very useful Allan - thanks for sharing.
Mike

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from:
Martin Carew
 

 

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I am sure it isn't rocket science but how can I adapt this jig for Flat Bottom rail? Specifically Code 82 in 00 gauge?
JFS wrote: Hello Chaps,

Just a quick update showing how I do Switch Tongues. First a confession, these pics show the use of a little clamp to hold the toe of the tongue: well, I only made it about half an hour ago. Previously, I always used my thumb for this job! In these health and safety conscious days, I thought the pics should show a proper job! (It took me about 10 minutes to make the clamp...)

Firstly, filing the backs of the tongues...

Here are a single pair of rails clamped in the jig - notice that they are "handed" (foot to foot or head to head) and that the extent of the "planing" has been marked with a felt pen (off the Template)



The jig has been set with the clamp in the "B" position



After a few strokes with the bastard cut file, followed by the smooth cut file followed by a rub with 600 grit wet or dry wrapped over the smooth file we end up here



You can see the the metal removal extends just up to the pen mark and that the rail is down to about the mid-way line at the rail tip.

Now for the Guage Faces - here you see my nifty little clamp...

Turn the rail over and re-clamp it at the heel end, the toe end clamp (previously my thumb) just clamps the tip of the switch and only covers the foot of the rail.



In use, we use the file with its Safe Edge against the clamp



It is quite hard to distinguish the rail from the jig in this pic - locate the rail from the red felt pen mark on the rail which again marks the extent of the metal requiring to be removed



Here is the result after a few strokes with the big file - note that again the metal removal extends just into the red mark. When doing the guage face, I don't make use of any guide for the heel end of the file - the brass clamp is too low of course, I have never found this to be a problem, but others could modify the design to deal with this.

Note that this is a STRAIGHT CUT switch: for a curved switch, I trap a scrap of etch waste under the tongue to pack up its middle - crude but effective!

When all that is done, the rail will be "planed" but will taper equally on both sides - to turn it into a switch tongue requires of course that the rail be bent so that the gauge face is straight

You can see that the other tongue is done the same way but obviously using the other side of the jig (you can see the hole for this in the pic).
From this stage, the tongues require a final polish and deburring on the rail top and foot IMPORTANT use only a bit of fine wet or dry for this - NEVER take a file to the top or bottom of a rail!

Here's one I did earlier - I reckon it took less than 10 minutes to do these...



Just one quick thing - a number of people have asked about wear of the jig - I have never found this an issue for the penny numbers of switches we are making (15 pairs for my current opus) A far bigger issue for this jig is that the clamps use wood screws and these need re-plugging from time to time - those who want to take more than half an hour to make their version might resort to nuts and bolts or screws tapped into the brass base strip.

Hope that helps a bit!

Howard.


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from:
Hayfield
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Unlike the instructions from either the P4 or EM gauge societies I have read where they suggest filing on a flexible sheet like Formica, I have found the opposite easier, I use a stiff steel bar to file on and with flatbottom rail Clamping the to it using the foot against the edge

Also the use of sharp files 10". 6" and needle
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26th message | this message only posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:38
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from:
Martin Carew
 

 

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Thanks Hayfield - I have some Code 83 on the way from Microengineering so will give it a go. I am thinking about using the jig design with the same fittings but building it in such a way that the rail will sit flat across the edge of the brass strips. I will probably use steel though as I have a lot of it around from various welding jobs.


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27th message | this message only posted: 11 Jan 2019 11:04
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from:
Hayfield
United Kingdom

 

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My bought filing jigs are from hardened steel, where as my steel filing bar I guess is not hardened, its 3 mm thick by 25 mm wide, 305 mm long. 
 I find its far easier to use if the bar and the rail is clamped down do the bench. As its so much easier to file accurately with both hands free, with a slot in the bar it would be even easier but I use flatbottom rail so infrequently its not worth the bother to make anything more substantial

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28th message | this message only posted: 11 Jan 2019 11:34
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from:
Jim Guthrie
United Kingdom

 

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In the past I've used a bit of 2 x 1 wood and bullhead rail is placed flat on it at the end and the blade is filed using a 10" second cut file. For flatbottom rail, I cut a slot in the wood using a razor saw to take the base. I can mark off the length of the planing with a pencil mark on the wood. For holding the wood, I screwed a small piece of wood on the inderside to act as a stop against the work bench edge and the other end on the wood was in my midriff. The rail was held using a toolmaker's clamp. This worked well and when the end of the wood got worn down by the filing, cut it off, or turn the wood over and shift the stop block.

I have to confess that I have now set up my CNC machine to do blades and crossing rails so this is a bit of "do as I say not do as I do". :)

Jim.

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29th message | this message only posted: 11 Jan 2019 21:55
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from:
Martin Carew
 

 

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Jim - the CNC machine sounds interesting and something I have been looking at. Have you any info for your machine and how you make the blades?
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30th message | this message only posted: 12 Jan 2019 11:00
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from:
Jim Guthrie
United Kingdom

 

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Martin Carew wrote: Jim - the CNC machine sounds interesting and something I have been looking at. Have you any info for your machine and how you make the blades?

Martin,

I first made up a holder for the rail - here's the one I did for Ciff Barkers 1:32 bullhead rail



It was made from alloy with a step on the front face to support the rail.



The rail is clamped to the front of the jig with toolmakers clamps and the cutter has started the main machining of the planed face of the blade.



Here the cutter is just over half way down the planed face.     The planing is taken to the centre of the rail section so that half of the web thickness will be left.



And a bit of a jump to show five pairs of left and right planed blades.     What I didn't show was the planing of the rail head only on the other side of the rail.  That was the reason for the cutout on the jig to allow the cutter access to the other side of the rail head.   The rail head was tapered to be flush with the web face at the blade tip such that half of the web width remains to provide a stronger end to the blade.

The next operation is to cut off the excess rail with my Xuron cutters then bend the rail at the start of the taper to get a straight inner face and also re-instate the inner radius of the rail head on the planing and finish off the tip of the blade with a fine file.

I also did the same operation with Code 82 FB for my US S scale layout



Here the jig had an alloy base with a brass strip screwed to it to provide a face to hold the rail.  The lower edge of the strip was relieved to allow for the flat bottom base.



Here the main planed face is being cut with the depth of cut at the end being to the rail centre line to leave half web thickness at the end.    The rail head planing will be done on the other side.



And here are the resulting blades with their stock rails - the stock rails were filed by hand.  I could have machined them but it was quicker just to file them. :D

The excess rail at the tip end is necessary to hold the rail firm when cutting and even then it is advisable to work with fairly gentle feeds and speeds.    If I wanted to avoid this wastage I dare say I could leave the rail as a whole length and the cut part at the blade tip becomes the end of the next blade but my workspace is a bit restricted around the milling machine and having most of a three foot length of rail waving about in the breeze off the table is not really a possibility.

One problem I did find was trying to do this with Cliff Barker's stainless steel rail.  I suspect that the rail was work hardening under the light cuts and it became quite a fight to get anything good.  So I swapped on to his nickel silver rail and all was well.

I must say I found it really nice to have point blades all  cut properly.  It used to be a feature of previous tracklaying of mine that everything used to be completed except the point blades then I would grit my teeth and sit down and file the lot in one go. :D

Jim.

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31st message | this message only posted: 12 Jan 2019 11:38
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from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



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Hi Jim,

Many thanks for that -- takes me back to the 1970s/80s when I was manufacturing point blades commercially.

Just one minor point -- for every pair of blades there is usually a pair of check rails. If you made the clamped toe end of the rail a bit longer, you wouldn't be wasting any rail when you cut it off.

Space for someone to mention catch points and double slips:




but those check rails go into the diamond-crossings. :)

cheers,

Martin.

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32nd message | this message only posted: 12 Jan 2019 11:50
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from:
Jim Guthrie
United Kingdom

 

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Martin Wynne wrote: Just one minor point -- for every pair of blades there is usually a pair of check rails. If you made the clamped toe end of the rail a bit longer, you wouldn't be wasting any rail when you cut it off.


Martin,

In the case of the 1:32 scale pointwork,  that would be a sensible idea to minimise waste :D   But in my S scale pointwork I was using self guarding frogs - so no checkrails. :D



Jim.

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33rd message | this message only posted: 12 Jan 2019 11:59
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from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



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Jim Guthrie wrote:In the case of the 1:32 scale pointwork,  that would be a sensible idea to minimise waste :D   But in my S scale pointwork I was using self guarding frogs - so no checkrails. :DHi Jim,

There is always one. :)

I think that is the first time I have seen functional self-guarding frogs modelled. Do they work well?

For anyone asking, the reason they are not used in the UK is that they require all wheels to be the same width, from large locos down to the smallest wagon. Which is not the case in the UK.

cheers,

Martin.

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34th message | this message only posted: 12 Jan 2019 15:20
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from:
Jim Guthrie
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Martin Wynne wrote: I think that is the first time I have seen functional self-guarding frogs modelled. Do they work well?Martin,

They work very well.  They are designed to work with Code 110 wheels which is the normal NMRA S scale wheel.  But some of the locomotive wheels were a bit wider,  so have had a visit to the lathe.  :D

US modelers had suggested that they should only be used at low speed and that's the norm on my switching layout,  but I've had a few tries at higher speeds and they seem to work quite well.

Jim.

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35th message | this message only posted: 12 Jan 2019 21:33
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from:
Trevor Walling
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Hello,
I always find it fascinating when people with similar skills get interacting with each other.
trustytrev.:)
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36th message | this message only posted: 12 Jan 2019 23:09
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from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

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Jim Guthrie wrote:  I was using self guarding frogs - so no checkrails. :D

Jim.
I was waiting for a train at Hoboken the first time I saw them. It took a while before I understood how they worked :)

This is my "vise helper" for FB rail. It drops into my bench vise which squeezes the plates together to grip the rail. The alignment pins are 1/8th inch piano wire. The notches have different depths to allow for the FB foot. This ugly brute lets me really lean on the file. It doesn't take a lot of strokes.

You can just about see a slot cut with a piercing saw. I use it to cut nice square ends on the rails.



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