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             Rating                           Building Yeovil Pen Mill in EM
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201st message | this message only posted: 6 Nov 2018 09:51
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Rob Manchester wrote: That is good Andrew. Are you counter-sinking cheesehead bolts into the 'timber'? Can't quite see from the last pic as it a little blurred on my screen ( polite way of saying your depth of field is too small ).

Could you sand the copperclad 'timber' thinner on one face to match the depth of the other timbers - you only need the copper to solder to on one side- unless you are also soldering the bolt heads to the copper.

Look forward to future updates.
Rob
 
Hello Rob

No I'm slightly countersinking counter sunk bolts but possibly the picture  shows a cheese head(?) which i used to align the nut when soldering to the bottoe of the timber. so 10 out 10 for paying attention and an eye for detail. As a proper photographer your camera will doubtless have inumerable F stops with which to play. My Iphone seems to lack this, so my apologies for the lack focus. 
 
This would have my parents turning in their graves as they were both in the photgraphic trade most of their lives. Back in the 60's and 70's Dad had Pentax which was very swish at the time, and Mum a Rollei, Very confusing looking into the lense finder on that whilst at the same time putting your hand over it to shade the screen enough to seeing anything atall. but she loved it!
 
Yes i could have filed the copper away on the top but i did that with the previous boards and it nearlty drove me crazy taking 0.8mm off evenly so when I came across the 1.06mm stuff I jumped at it. So no there no need for copper on the top as the head of the bolt is the hinge and needs to turn, albeit by not much! 
 
Thanks for the continued encouragement. 
Andrew 



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202nd message | this message only posted: 17 Nov 2018 00:33
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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A few years ago I made up jigs for all the Vs I’d need for the layout and so using three of these I’ve made up 7 of them for the turnouts on this board  I’ve then assembled three of them(so far) on a duplicate plan. On the plan I first superglued some strips of brass about 2mm wide and 0.5mm thick below where the timbers support crossing and closure rails.




I hope this photo shows what I mean. Here you can see the brass strips supporting the Vs, the wing rails and closure rails. And here you can also see the two 1.0mm spacers I use to set the flange way gaps through the crossing. They are very shallow in height and so a bit fiddly but, I find the benefit of being able to see exactly what’s going on, on either side of the gauge pays dividends for my slightly haphazard way of working. I got the idea from Tony Gee at Missenden last summer. 



Having then soldered up the assembly I put a sharp knife under the brass strips to lift them off the temporary plan and give them thorough scrub in the sink. I’m using steel rail so being able to get rid of all flux deposits it an advantage. 


 
Having dried them they’re then ready to glue in place on the layout, having first trimmed the excess brass strip to length flush up against the side of the rail. 

That’s about it for now. 
Kind regards 
Andrew



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203rd message | this message only posted: 17 Nov 2018 18:27
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from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester



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Andrew,

Thanks for the 'proper photographer' comment although I think 'photographic equipment geek' would be more appropriate :)....and yes I have many f-stops on all my lenses. The trouble with close-up photography with 'proper' cameras with large digital sensors is that the depth of acceptable focus at close distances is very small ( but increases as you stop-down the aperture ). An iphone 6/7/8 has a sensor only 6 x 4.8mm and has much greater depth of focus as this is related mathematically to the sensor size. I could get very technical here but I won't.

If I wanted to remove the copper on one side of a timer I would just rub it up and down on wet'n dry paper until it was gone. Just an idea. The methods involved in assembling the crossings are very similar to what I use although I often put some of the brass strips between the timbers so you can use normal chairs functionally. Takes a bit of planning though.....


Rob



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204th message | this message only posted: 18 Nov 2018 00:29
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Rob Manchester wrote: Andrew,

Thanks for the 'proper photographer' comment although I think 'photographic equipment geek' would be more appropriate :)....and yes I have many f-stops on all my lenses. The trouble with close-up photography with 'proper' cameras with large digital sensors is that the depth of acceptable focus at close distances is very small ( but increases as you stop-down the aperture ). An iphone 6/7/8 has a sensor only 6 x 4.8mm and has much greater depth of focus as this is related mathematically to the sensor size. I could get very technical here but I won't.

If I wanted to remove the copper on one side of a timer I would just rub it up and down on wet'n dry paper until it was gone. Just an idea. The methods involved in assembling the crossings are very similar to what I use although I often put some of the brass strips between the timbers so you can use normal chairs functionally. Takes a bit of planning though.....

Rob


Hello Rob

When you say that you sometimes put brass strips between the timbers, how do you stop them showing up? Having written this question to you, I suppose within the confines of the crossing area they might not show as rails are so close together?
I may give your wet and dry technique a go with hinge sleepers on the next baseboard. 

My iPhone is a 5 incidentally, so I imagine the digital sensor is probably smaller still, but it doesn’t seem to have done the trick in my snapshots!

Kind regards 
Andrew




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205th message | this message only posted: 18 Nov 2018 08:00
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from:
Hayfield
United Kingdom

 

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if using plastic timbers I am happy using the plastic chairs functionally using prebuilt Vees not common crossing assemblies. I use the Exactoscale products (E4CH 502A common crossing and E4CH 403A 0.8 check rail chairs) mostly as designed following the Exactoscale common crossing chair guide with these exceptions :-

1/ A&B timber positions I use either slide chair bases or 0.5 copperclad to support the tip of the Vee
2/ B timber position I use check chairs on the wing rails with one outer chair part removed
3/ X chair position I either use the centre part of a check chair or a centre part of one of the block chairs on the common crossing fret the correct size to fill the gap
4/ The gap between the wingrails and Vee in the A position can be filled with check rail chair centres if required

I have found this method totally reliable with plastic timbers, but would hesitate with ply timbers owing to the strength of bond between ply & plastic

You could switch the X & B timbers for either plastic of copperclad timbers, with the latter substitute plastic chairs with cast metal half chairs
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206th message | this message only posted: 18 Nov 2018 12:14
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from:
Nigel Brown
 

 

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Hayfield wrote: if using plastic timbers I am happy using the plastic chairs functionally using prebuilt Vees not common crossing assemblies. I use the Exactoscale products (E4CH 502A common crossing and E4CH 403A 0.8 check rail chairs) mostly as designed following the Exactoscale common crossing chair guide with these exceptions :-

1/ A&B timber positions I use either slide chair bases or 0.5 copperclad to support the tip of the Vee
2/ B timber position I use check chairs on the wing rails with one outer chair part removed
3/ X chair position I either use the centre part of a check chair or a centre part of one of the block chairs on the common crossing fret the correct size to fill the gap
4/ The gap between the wingrails and Vee in the A position can be filled with check rail chair centres if required

I have found this method totally reliable with plastic timbers, but would hesitate with ply timbers owing to the strength of bond between ply & plastic

You could switch the X & B timbers for either plastic of copperclad timbers, with the latter substitute plastic chairs with cast metal half chairsHi Hayfield

I used a similar system on my 3mm'ft layout. Only 3-bolt chairs for plain track plus slide chairs were available at the time. Everything else was built by carving those chairs as necessary. I used Plastruct strip for sleepers/timbers, and Plastic Weld to fit everything together. The result is as solid as a rock, but things can be adjusted by sliding a thin blade between chair and sleepers/timbers.

However, as one might expect, chairs and sleepers need to be of a compatible plastic. The 3mm Society fairly recently introduced its own chairs, but no sleepering or timbering to go with it. These chairs don't work well with Plastic Weld, so Plastruct strip is no good. I'm told Butanone, which I can't stand, will work with the chairs, I suspect Mekpak will as well; neither works well with Plastruct. It's been suggested that Evergreen strip is a different plastic from Plastruct and should work, but I've yet to try it out. Obviously in 4mm the Exactoscale or C&L products should work together OK; I mention the above in case someone is working in unusual scales. The 3mm Society approach seems to be based on the assumption that everyone will use ply sleepers, something I've not found satisfactory.

Nigel

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207th message | this message only posted: 18 Nov 2018 21:18
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from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester



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Hello Andrew,

Sorry. I should have been more specific in my suggestion concerning brass strips between the timbers - it would only usually be done like this if I were modelling a location where the ballast or other surface was high enough to at least partially hide the brass.

As John ( Hayfield ) has noted the bond strength with chairs to plastic sleepers is excellent and many people just build crossings without any additional support. Chair to timber joint strength isn't quite as robust especially if the timbers have been pre stained.

The ip5 sensor is a little smaller than later models but I wouldn't worry about it as the difference is very small. I bet the camera is better than my Huawei/Tesco/Android :(....but at least I never go out without a camera of some sort.

Rob


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208th message | this message only posted: 20 Nov 2018 00:06
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Rob Manchester wrote: Hello Andrew,

Sorry. I should have been more specific in my suggestion concerning brass strips between the timbers - it would only usually be done like this if I were modelling a location where the ballast or other surface was high enough to at least partially hide the brass.

As John ( Hayfield ) has noted the bond strength with chairs to plastic sleepers is excellent and many people just build crossings without any additional support. Chair to timber joint strength isn't quite as robust especially if the timbers have been pre stained.

The ip5 sensor is a little smaller than later models but I wouldn't worry about it as the difference is very small. I bet the camera is better than my Huawei/Tesco/Android :(....but at least I never go out without a camera of some sort.

Rob

Hello Rob
No apology necessary and thanks for your various explanations. I’m glad my iPhone isn’t beyond redemption! In fact I keep on being quite impressed by its abilities particularly at taking close ups of railway related stuff and think the definition isn’t at all bad considering the minute size of the lens and that it’s not its main function. 

But maybe thats like comparing a clockwork tinplate with P4!

Kind regards 
Andrew








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209th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 00:21
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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A bit of an update. 
On Tony Wilkins thread on  the Scalefour Society’s Eforum I came across Howard Bolton’s reference to a rather nifty and simple to construct tiebar arrangement that Mike Norris uses on his very large layout which he describes in Scalefour News 181 (early 2013). They are a simple arrangement with the copper paxolin moving sleeper idea turned literally through 90 degrees so that it’s lies on edge. So far Ive made up three of these and apart from a mild concern that it may suffer from metal fatigue it’s no more work to make and install than my current rather ugly efforts
I hope the photos will show what I’m describing better than my words. This photo shows the switches awaiting the new tie-bar.





And this one shows it installed. Bit difficult to see, but that of course is it’s charm. 




I’m using fibreglass covered copper gapped on both sides which I feel is a bit stronger and finer/thinner than the copper paxolin sleeper material I use for the loose heeled hinge sleepers. 
Andrew




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210th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 01:27
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from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

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Andrew Duncan wrote: A bit of an update. 
On Tony Wilkins thread on  the Scalefour Society’s Eforum I came across Howard Bolton’s reference to a rather nifty and simple to construct tiebar arrangement that Mike Norris uses on his very large layout which he describes in Scalefour News 181 (early 2013). They are a simple arrangement with the copper paxolin moving sleeper idea turned literally through 90 degrees so that it’s lies on edge. So far Ive made up three of these and apart from a mild concern that it may suffer from metal fatigue it’s no more work to make and install than my current rather ugly efforts
I hope the photos will show what I’m describing better than my words. This photo shows the switches awaiting the new tie-bar.





And this one shows it installed. Bit difficult to see, but that of course is it’s charm. 




I’m using fibreglass covered copper gapped on both sides which I feel is a bit stronger and finer/thinner than the copper paxolin sleeper material I use for the loose heeled hinge sleepers. 
Andrew



Hi Andrew,

In my experience with that arrangement the solder joints will fail. PCB material is just not flexible enough. There's a trick that lets you substitute a vertical phosphor bronze strip instead.

Form a piece of PB into a right angle and solder it to a double-sided FR4 tie-bar. Now grind away most of the tie-bar and the horizontal part of the PB. You will be left with a very flexible PB tie-bar with two insulated pads to solder the switch rails to.

Somewhere there is a photo showing this in a bit more detail. I'll post it if I can ever find it again :)

Cheers,
Andy

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211th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 08:15
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Hello Andy


Thanks for your reply and yes I agree with you it would be very fragile if it were perhaps as I may have described . So my apologies for not taking more time to do a proper job of explaining how I did it. 

I made up a little jig to enable me to driI two holes just over 15mm apart in the centre of tie-bar material. I then  soldered in a separate (Edit to correct the dimension) 0.45mm wire into each hole ( equivalent to the pad you suggested) the business end of which is bent through ninety degrees( once vertically and once horizontally) which ends up with 3 or 4mm of wire lieing horizontal. And this wire can be soldered into the web of the rail. 

So it’s the wire that takes the strain  and my concern is that this may “give” in time. However I believe that a largish number have been  in use now over some years on Mikes layout.  If you have access to the description in Scalefour news 181 then all will be clear. If not then I’ll take picture or two of it later which will help make things clearer. 


Kind regards 
Andrew


edit  PS I realise looking at  both photos of two different switches that they don’t appear to be a snug fit in the joggle and this important for reliable running so I shall be going back to check on this and do some “acing” on both the fit and the blade shape on the running surface. 



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212th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 08:56
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from:
Stephen Freeman
Sandbach, United Kingdom



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Not too dissimilar to the AMBIS solution. Being "old-fashioned" I also believe in the belt and braces approach to common crossings. A couple of small points though. I think the blades overhang the slide chairs a bit too much and have you considered replacing the slide chairs with the Modelu ones?
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213th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 09:31
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from:
JFS
United Kingdom

 

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Since my name is mentioned in Andrew's post, I feel I ought to contribute to correct a few mis-impressions. Firstly I wonder if either Stephen or Andy have actually read the original article before offering comment on the design? Andy, you say you have "experience of this arrangement" yet you seem to miss the point that it is the design of the wires which creates the flexibility NOT the PCB. I hereby accuse you of jumping to assumption!!! Stephen, perhaps you can describe to me in what way this is similar to the Ambis design? If you refer to the original magazine to which Andrew refers, you will see (coincidentally) a lengthy article by myself decsribing my use of the Ambis design and I specifically mention NOT to use PCB as it is not flexible enough (I use GRE and bonded joints). So I would rather say that Mikes design is at exactly the opposite end of the design spectrum to the Ambis design.
Finally - Andrew - severe smacked wrist for you. Why on earth have you chosen to gap the PCB like that rather than the way Mike designed it? You have the gap on both sides opposite each other (creating a stress raiser) whereas Mike has two gaps on one side and single one on the other so that they reinforce each other. And you have gone well into the "bone" beyond the "meat" beyond the fat!
The trouble with all good designs is that the brilliance lies in the subtle detail which the critics can't be @rs*d to comprehend...
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214th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 12:52
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from:
Stephen Freeman
Sandbach, United Kingdom



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At the moment I must admit that I am failing to see the difference between GRE and GRE copperclad suitably gapped (yes it is possible though difficult to do it without affecting the GRE) other than the advantage of being able to solder rather than rely on a glued joint. Flexibility of Copperclad depends largely on the type of Copperclad involved. 1mm or 1.6mm is far too thick of course to impart any flexibility. Alan Austin suggests 0.5mm for 7mm scale and 0.25mm for 4mm scale.

Andy's method is different as it is not intended to look like a stretcher bar as it is to be hidden as much as possible with a suitably cosmetic stretcher bar to be added. Howard is right about the copperclad gaps of course.

Yes I have read the article, still don't like the idea of relying on glued joints and of course Alan Austin has since changed the design of his fixings.

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215th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 13:45
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from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



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Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Copied from a post of mine on RMweb:
________________________________

In the olden days (1970s) I manufactured tie-bars based on these methods as part of my Kit-Trak range. The pin is free to rotate in the bar as the points move over, so the design is entirely stress-free. The switch rail is free to take up the correct prototypical curve in the open position, for both flexible and loose-heel switches.

The bar runs directly under the stock rail, holding the switch blade down on the slide chair and preventing the tip from kicking up under traffic (an important function of prototype stretcher bars, especially on loose-heel switches).

The tie-bar was unclad 1/32" fibreglass, 3mm wide. The 1mm dia. pins were turned from nickel-silver or brass, having a thin head below the tie-bar and a small profiled groove to receive the foot of the switch blade for soldering. Anyone with a lathe would be able to replicate that method. I will try to find the pin drawing. It produced a reliable and unobtrusive blade fixing. The construction depth below the stock rails is less than the timber/chair/rivet depth, providing a clearance in the event any particles of ballast get underneath it.
 
Hi Gordon,
 
I could find only a scruffy sketch from 1975, so here's a new sketch. It's a good few years since I made any of these pins. They are quite quick to do, the groove doesn't have to be too precise, it gets filled with solder (stiffening the pin in the process). I used a form tool to make these pins in production:




_______________________

These tie-bars were used on Adavoyle Junction (P4 21mm gauge) and gave no trouble during the 20 years it was on the exhibition circuit:



They are unobtrusive and can be further hidden by sprinkling a bit of ballast on top of them, and adding dummy prototype stretcher bars (we never got round to doing that).

Assembly is very easy, because the switch blade foot locates into the pin dry, with a bit of packing from the stock rail. Then some phos flux, a dab with a loaded soldering iron, and you are done.

regards,
 
Martin.

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216th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 20:24
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from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

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Couldn't find the photo so I made this example to help explain what I was wittering on about.

Strip of 0.031" double sided FR-4 and piece of PB strip folded down the middle.



Solder the PB to the FR-4 then grind away the bits you don't want.



I've no idea if this is any simpler or better than any other method :)

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217th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 22:07
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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JFS wrote: Since my name is mentioned in Andrew's post, I feel I ought to contribute to correct a few mis-impressions. Firstly I wonder if either Stephen or Andy have actually read the original article before offering comment on the design? Andy, you say you have "experience of this arrangement" yet you seem to miss the point that it is the design of the wires which creates the flexibility NOT the PCB. I hereby accuse you of jumping to assumption!!! Stephen, perhaps you can describe to me in what way this is similar to the Ambis design? If you refer to the original magazine to which Andrew refers, you will see (coincidentally) a lengthy article by myself decsribing my use of the Ambis design and I specifically mention NOT to use PCB as it is not flexible enough (I use GRE and bonded joints). So I would rather say that Mikes design is at exactly the opposite end of the design spectrum to the Ambis design.
Finally - Andrew - severe smacked wrist for you. Why on earth have you chosen to gap the PCB like that rather than the way Mike designed it? You have the gap on both sides opposite each other (creating a stress raiser) whereas Mike has two gaps on one side and single one on the other so that they reinforce each other. And you have gone well into the "bone" beyond the "meat" beyond the fat!
The trouble with all good designs is that the brilliance lies in the subtle detail which the critics can't be @rs*d to comprehend...
Hello Howard
Guilty as charged...!  but not out of carelessness or don’t give a damn, just an enthusiast desire to get on try it! I shall now pay some attention to how I gap!

Kind regards 
Andrew



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218th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 22:12
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Stephen Freeman wrote: Not too dissimilar to the AMBIS solution. Being "old-fashioned" I also believe in the belt and braces approach to common crossings. A couple of small points though. I think the blades overhang the slide chairs a bit too much and have you considered replacing the slide chairs with the Modelu ones?Hello Stephen
Yup I think you’re correct about the blade length. What do you feel is the benefit of the Modelu slide chairs ?
Andrew

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219th message | this message only posted: 9 Dec 2018 22:25
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Andi
Thanks for going to the trouble to make one to explain your approach which I now understand. I shall stick to the Norris version, suitably chastened by my lack of observation and now have two cuts one side, and one tother :).!

Kind regards 
Andrew

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220th message | this message only posted: 10 Dec 2018 07:36
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from:
Stephen Freeman
Sandbach, United Kingdom



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I'll try again - something weird going on with the edit option -
Modelu 2 bolt sliderail chair - from a scan of GWR slide rail chair
Exactoscale/C&L - wrong shape and too many bolts.

C&L have an almost accurate version in 7mm scale - missing representation of bolt securing chair to rail.

Link to Modelu sliderail chair
Stephen Freeman wrote: Not too dissimilar to the AMBIS solution. Being "old-fashioned" I also believe in the belt and braces approach to common crossings. A couple of small points though. I think the blades overhang the slide chairs a bit too much and have you considered replacing the slide chairs with the Modelu ones?Hello Stephen

Yup I think you’re correct about the blade length. What do you feel is the benefit of the Modelu slide chairs ?
Andrew


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from:
JFS
United Kingdom

 

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Andrew Duncan wrote: Hello Howard
Guilty as charged...!  but not out of carelessness or don’t give a damn, just an enthusiast desire to get on try it! I shall now pay some attention to how I gap!
It will all seem so much easier once your sore wrists are better!!

Good luck and Best Wishes,

Howard

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222nd message | this message only posted: 12 Dec 2018 22:26
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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JFS wrote: Andrew Duncan wrote: Hello Howard
Guilty as charged...!  but not out of carelessness or don’t give a damn, just an enthusiast desire to get on try it! I shall now pay some attention to how I gap!
It will all seem so much easier once your sore wrists are better!Good luck and Best Wishes,
Howard
Hello Howard
Thank you I’m sure it will!

I had another look at the article to try understand why I missed this clever design feature ( two cuts one side one the other) and couldn’t see any reference to it. Are you sure it isn’t an improvement that you made when you made some. It seems to be quite clear in the article  that Mike has gapped as I did,  opposite each other...?

Have I misunderstood  your meaning somehow?

Kind regards 
Andrew


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223rd message | this message only posted: 24 Dec 2018 03:44
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Hello Everyone
 I’ve not made much progress in the last few weeks electrics apart. But on this subject I’ve installed the Megapoints board for controlling the turnout and signal servos and here’s there’s been an interesting development. But before I get to that I’ve also decided to use the Megapoints relay board, as I had one in stock, to change the polarity of the crossings as previously did on the junction board. So in addition to the Servo control board there’s the interface board for the relays and the two relay boards themselves. 

Anyway back to signal operation. I think I mentioned a little while ago a chap, John over on RMWeb, who’s building an impressive layout of Leeds City the Midland side in EM. I noticed having read through 30 odd pages logging his progress since late 2012, that he’d developed a very neat MDF frame which holds the servos and off which he’d constructed his signals. After some brief communication he kindly sent me three examples to play with. I have since made up all three frames and actually put together a Home starter signal (one of Ratio almost readymade ones for speed) on one of the three frames.  An exercise that took remarkably little time including installing the servo itself and linking it up to the Megapoints board. And it works and as with any Megapoints install it’s a doddle to adjust. 

Incidentally I chose a very small digital servo (from Hobbyking) for this purpose as I read somewhere that they didn’t move on start up (so less likelyhood of damage to the signal mechanism)  and sure enough it remained stoically silent throughout the whole process. Makes me wonder if I could use them as an alternative to the bigger 9gm servos for turnouts where space is tight and where servos are mounted topside. I’ve included a couple of photos of the install which at present is just Bluetacked to edge of the baseboard. To give a better idea of how small this assembly is, the baseboard is 12mm thick MDF which I hope will give you an idea of how neat and small the servo frame is and indeed how small the servos themselves are. 

This shows the double width frame that could take two servos side by side




And this one an overall view of this rather hastily assembled experiment. Apologies if your a signal buff and this slightly gung-ho approach offends!





This is all very exciting stuff as I was quite concerned about how I was going to get reliable easily adjusted signals constructed that plugged in from above the baseboard, and this design of John’s has  made this a great deal easier and therefore more achievable. 

A happy and peaceful Christmas to you and thank you to all of you who have read about my goings on at the end of the dining room table and to those who have replied with thoughts and ideas over the last year. I find it surprising and really encouraging. Thanks. 

Kind regards 
Andrew

PS MartinAs this is wandering off the topic of track building would you prefer that I had posted to Share & Show?




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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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And finally to add a little more clarity to the previous post here are a couple more shots. 
This one shows the frame detail a little more clearly of the double width servo frame. 



And here’s the same thing in single width. On this one I’ve left it full length with two servos installed but as you can see it will take three and the same goes for the double width one above which if left at full length will take 6 servos. The question I ask myself then is do I have the skills to make the signal that these would drive...Unlikely! 

Happily I don’t need any more than two servos on any one post for Pen Mill



Andrew


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from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester



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Andrew Duncan wrote: A happy and peaceful Christmas to you and thank you to all of you who have read about my goings on at the end of the dining room table and to those who have replied with thoughts and ideas over the last year. I find it surprising and really encouraging. Thanks. 

Kind regards 
Andrew
Hi Andrew,
And the same to you too. Thanks for posting your activities on here for us to view. You always make interesting reading.

Rob


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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Thanks very much Rob, kind of you to say so. 
Kind regards 
Andrew

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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Incidentally to pick up on a previous conversation here is a photo of apparent order and calm taken close up of my current progress.

.

And here’s the same thing taken from the other end, cruelly showing the chaos I really work in. Sadly I’m going to have to give in to Nigel’s theory...





Andrew



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from:
Hayfield
United Kingdom

 

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Andrew

Looks quite normal to me, plus I like to see the order people build their track formations in
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Hayfield wrote: Andrew

Looks quite normal to me, plus I like to see the order people build their track formations in

Thanks John
Yup there so many different approaches to building track.  Indeed this is a different one to my previous efforts as I’m building the crossings separately, directly on a spare Templot plan and then transferring them complete to the waiting sleepers!  Not done this before but it does enable me opportunity to give the crossing a good old wash and brush up ( after all the soldering ) that isn’t possible if already stuck in place and, as I mentioned earlier, when using steel rail that’s a real benefit in keeping corrosion at bay. 

I feel also that it helps me build a more accurate crossing which is so often the part of turnout construction that trips me up!

Kind regards 
Andrew

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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Cry for help!

I’ve just run out of the Exactoscale plastic insulating Fishplates ( the double sided ones with insulating break in the middle) and Exactoscale appear to be out of stock.

 Does anyone know where I might beg, buy or borrow some? 

Kind regards 
Andrew


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from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester



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Andrew Duncan wrote: Cry for help!

I’ve just run out of the Exactoscale plastic insulating Fishplates ( the double sided ones with insulating break in the middle) and Exactoscale appear to be out of stock.

 Does anyone know where I might beg, buy or borrow some? 

Kind regards 
Andrew
Hi Andrew,
Happy New Year to you :D Do you not celebrate with a whiskey and a knees up ? Surely checking stock of fishplates isn't a fair substitute.......

I just checked my stash and I haven't any Exactoscale one's or anything similar. Sorry. I did have some whiskey earlier.. :D

Best
Rob


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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Rob Manchester wrote: Andrew Duncan wrote: Cry for help!

I’ve just run out of the Exactoscale plastic insulating Fishplates ( the double sided ones with insulating break in the middle) and Exactoscale appear to be out of stock.

 Does anyone know where I might beg, buy or borrow some? 

Kind regards 
Andrew
Hi Andrew,
Happy New Year to you :D Do you not celebrate with a whiskey and a knees up ? Surely checking stock of fishplates isn't a fair substitute.......

I just checked my stash and I haven't any Exactoscale one's or anything similar. Sorry. I did have some whiskey earlier.. :D

Best
Rob

Hello Rob
And a happy new year to you as well! 

No, no whiskey or even whisky, but a good or even average Bordeaux is very much my taste, drunk of course from the correct Riedel glass really  brings out that lovely gravelly taste that some have. 

Incidentally Riedel, if you haven’t come across them do an excellent single malt Whisky glass which if you haven’t tried it you should seriously consider, especially if you’re currently using a traditional whisky tumbler. You might well think you’re drinking a much older more mature spirit. 

If I’m beginning to sound like a salesman forgive me and ( full disclosure) yes we do sell them! But I’m really just an enthusiast for the product. 

Thanks for looking in your stash, much appreciated. Here’s hoping that someone either knows a retailer with some stock or has some they’d sell or lend me. I’ll keep my fingers crossed!

Kind regards 
Andrew



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from:
Graham Idle
Redhill, Surrey, United Kingdom



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Hi Andrew,
I have some frets of 4XX FP01 if thats any use to you. I only live in Salfords so you could pick them up if you are in a hurry for them.
Regards, Graham Idle

Andrew Duncan wrote: Cry for help!

I’ve just run out of the Exactoscale plastic insulating Fishplates ( the double sided ones with insulating break in the middle) and Exactoscale appear to be out of stock.

 Does anyone know where I might beg, buy or borrow some? 

Kind regards 
Andrew



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richard_t
Nr. Spalding, South Holland, United Kingdom



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I've looked in my stash of 4mm track parts, but no fishplates I'm afraid.

Richard
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Graham Idle wrote: Hi Andrew,
I have some frets of 4XX FP01 if thats any use to you. I only live in Salfords so you could pick them up if you are in a hurry for them.
Regards, Graham Idle

Andrew Duncan wrote: Cry for help!

I’ve just run out of the Exactoscale plastic insulating Fishplates ( the double sided ones with insulating break in the middle) and Exactoscale appear to be out of stock.

 Does anyone know where I might beg, buy or borrow some? 

Kind regards 
Andrew


Hello Graham
Thank you very much indeed for your offer. May I check that we’re talking about the same thing. I’ve just found a picture of the 7mm version on the web and have added it below. If we talking about the same thing I’d be delighted to take you up on your kind offer.  




Kind regards
Andrew





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from:
Graham Idle
Redhill, Surrey, United Kingdom



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Hi Andrew,
Yes those are they, I assume the 4XX denotes 4mm. I have 3 full frets and one with 9 fishplates on, if these will help you, please give me a ring on 07732953848 and we can arrange collection.
Regards, Graham
Andrew Duncan wrote: Graham Idle wrote: Hi Andrew,
I have some frets of 4XX FP01 if thats any use to you. I only live in Salfords so you could pick them up if you are in a hurry for them.
Regards, Graham Idle

Andrew Duncan wrote: Cry for help!

I’ve just run out of the Exactoscale plastic insulating Fishplates ( the double sided ones with insulating break in the middle) and Exactoscale appear to be out of stock.

 Does anyone know where I might beg, buy or borrow some? 

Kind regards 
Andrew


Hello Graham
Thank you very much indeed for your offer. May I check that we’re talking about the same thing. I’ve just found a picture of the 7mm version on the web and have added it below. If we talking about the same thing I’d be delighted to take you up on your kind offer.  




Kind regards
Andrew






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from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester



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Hi Andrew,
I hope the fishplates for 4mm fit a little better than the version that Exactoscale made for 7mm. I had some of the larger ones and they needed a lot of modification to fit if I remember correctly which is why I went onto using etched ones ( which won't be much use when insulation is required of course ).

Thanks for the glasses insight ( drinking not reading ). My whisk(e)y gets drunk from a very old Ravenhead chunky tumbler :D It tastes just the same whatever glass I use......but then I do pollute it with a little water. The whisky is Aldi's Islay malt which is a damn good buy at less than 18 quid a bottle and the stout cardboard tubes are great for storing plastic strip, handrail rail and the like.

Rob


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from:
Stephen Freeman
Sandbach, United Kingdom



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I have used both fairly recently without much problem. The only thing I have ever found necesary is to ensure there is no burr on rail web.Easiy sorted.

Available from either EMGS or Exactoscale I think.
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Thanks very much Graham, I’ll ring you tomorrow Andrew

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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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richard_t wrote: I've looked in my stash of 4mm track parts, but no fishplates I'm afraid.

Richard
Thanks for looking Richard.
 Andrew

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