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             Rating     Building Yeovil Pen Mill in EM
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601st message | this message only posted: 30 Oct 2020 10:12
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from:
Hayfield
United Kingdom

 

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If they were introduced in 1932, then a bit late for you


These are the new sprues, 10 standard chairs, 2 bridge , standard chairs and fishplates



From Left to right standard, J then bridge chairs. The later two have never been available in 2 bolt GWR versions



Closer view of the other part of the sprue



Close up of the H section fishplates, these are available separately in both plastic and brass



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602nd message | this message only posted: 30 Oct 2020 21:19
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Rob Manchester
Manchester, United Kingdom



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Hi Matt,

Sounds like good fun along the way - thanks for the info. Pity we can't have a compromise on modern cars - rustproof bodies and mechanical/electrical parts that can be fixed at home. I have lost track of the number of cars I have fixed for fiends and neighbours over the years - the last one I can remember was a LR Defender that wouldn't crank over on the starter - just needed a new 12v feed wire to the starter relay and back in business. I have had new/nearly new cars for around 12 years now after I got fed up of spending every other weekend repairing things that had rusted of broken.

Meanwhile back to Yeovil ( sorry Andrew....)

Rob


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603rd message | this message only posted: 31 Oct 2020 06:39
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Matt M. wrote: HI Andrew,

Regards, Matt M.

PS I have enjoyed the car diversion.
Yup so have I and I dont think its finished yet ....Andrew

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604th message | this message only posted: 31 Oct 2020 06:49
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from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

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Good grief! You're up early :D

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605th message | this message only posted: 31 Oct 2020 07:36
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Andrew Barrowman wrote: Good grief! You're up early :D
Hello Andy
Yup the price I pay, from time to time, of running my own business. At present rather than just worry or concern its more finding the time to do everything  that needs to be done. We are in the throws of moving our stock control system (EPOS) to a new provider after 21 years, and the new system goes a long way towards being an ERM system that will be pretty slick once settled in I believe, but is taking an enormous amount of effort and time to train everyone on it. 

So I woke up early thinking I'd get some stuff done, and I have....catching up on the re-awoken Yeovil thread. Very enjoyable
Andrew

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606th message | this message only posted: 31 Oct 2020 09:21
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from:
Hayfield
United Kingdom

 

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With all the things going on at the moment its nice to have a diversion.
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607th message | this message only posted: 3 Nov 2020 22:16
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Hayfield wrote: With all the things going on at the moment its nice to have a diversion.Hello John
Yup agreed, and thanks or the pictures of the all the new lines from C&L. I take it these are extra sprues not replacing the parts being available separately as they have always been...?

Kind regards
Andrew

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608th message | this message only posted: 3 Nov 2020 22:29
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Matt M. wrote:
Like Andrew Barrowman I had a 132 for awhile. Mine was fitted with a three
speed slush-matic gearbox which really didn't suit the Lampredi four-pot at all.
Fixed the handling (they were a little soft) by fitting the lower front springs of
a 125 at the front and fitting a strut brace across the shock towers at the rear.
Made a massive difference.

Matt M.
Hello Matt
Some very nice reminiscences here, and talking of 125's I recall that at the lock up garages where my parents kept their car (remote from the house which wasn't accessible by road) there was a chap who just took delivery of a brand new Fiat 125 and it got to 60mph a couple of seconds ahead of our Volvo Amazon 122S....I was very jealous. but at least the Volvo saw off the Triumph and Rover 2000s with comparative ease!

Great memories!

Andrew

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609th message | this message only posted: 3 Nov 2020 22:34
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Rob Manchester wrote: Hi Matt,

Sounds like good fun along the way - thanks for the info. Pity we can't have a compromise on modern cars - rustproof bodies and mechanical/electrical parts that can be fixed at home. I have lost track of the number of cars I have fixed for fiends and neighbours over the years - the last one I can remember was a LR Defender that wouldn't crank over on the starter - just needed a new 12v feed wire to the starter relay and back in business. I have had new/nearly new cars for around 12 years now after I got fed up of spending every other weekend repairing things that had rusted of broken.

Meanwhile back to Yeovil ( sorry Andrew....)

Rob

No apology necessary Rob. I think everyone's thoroughly enjoying the memories and nostalgia. I'm  certainly doing so...
Kind regards
Andrew

Edit
Here is the rather sad day that I said goodbye to my 1962 MGA Deluxe...



Not looking terribly happy but the tyres managed to stay inflated for 25 years without use! Apparently the engine started first time when they tried as well. Gone to a good home.

Andrew

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610th message | this message only posted: 3 Nov 2020 22:43
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from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

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My dad had a 125S and I used to take it for a spin. I never actually pranged it. We were less than impressed with the local Fiat place. They failed to replace one of the four big bolts that attached the bell-housing to the engine when they renewed the clutch. Fortunately I happened to notice it before there was any damage. I was also less than impressed by my Volvo dealer in California. They left one of the wheel bolts out when they gave my brand new XC70 its first service!
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611th message | this message only posted: 3 Nov 2020 23:33
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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John Lewis wrote: Rob Manchester wrote: Matt M. wrote: PS I have enjoyed the car diversion.Back on track then.... :?

Rob


Must have been at a level crossing.    :D

John
Very witty chaps...!😊Andrew

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612th message | this message only posted: 3 Nov 2020 23:50
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Andrew Barrowman wrote: My dad had a 125S and I used to take it for a spin. I never actually pranged it. We were less than impressed with the local Fiat place. They failed to replace one of the four big bolts that attached the bell-housing to the engine when they renewed the clutch. Fortunately I happened to notice it before there was any damage. I was also less than impressed by my Volvo dealer in California. They left one of the wheel bolts out when they gave my brand new XC70 its first service!Hello Andy

At work we have a saying / rule “ that mistakes are our friends” in other words a learning opportunity. I suppose there are some instances in life when that might be a bit too liberal an attitude. Not sure about bell housings, but wheel bolts and high voltages come to mind, when I think it might be too late to be friendly! Glad you spotted both before it ended in tears.

Andrew

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613th message | this message only posted: 4 Nov 2020 00:14
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from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester, United Kingdom



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Andrew Barrowman wrote: My dad had a 125S and I used to take it for a spin. I never actually pranged it. We were less than impressed with the local Fiat place. They failed to replace one of the four big bolts that attached the bell-housing to the engine when they renewed the clutch. Fortunately I happened to notice it before there was any damage. I was also less than impressed by my Volvo dealer in California. They left one of the wheel bolts out when they gave my brand new XC70 its first service!Andrew Andy,
Funny that - just been watching reviews etc on the XC70. Nice cars Volvo's - had a 940 saloon back in the 1990's and it was so comfortable. When we got the Subaru Outback a few years back I had to convince my wife that it was a long term purchase and it did everything I wanted ( fishing, camps, beaches, holidays etc ) which indeed it does. She may just kill me if she catches a glance at my browsing history :( I think Volvo cooked the figures on fuel consumption though - the D5 2.4 diesel auto has a claimed average of 48MPG - I guess that is downhill in neutral.......spare a thought for us Brits with fuel at £5.50 a gallon.

My worst garage job was when I had a Merc 190 estate. Took it in for a clutch replacement, picked it up and it worked great for a week until the gearbox linkage fell apart due to the bits they forgot to put back....

Rob



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614th message | this message only posted: 4 Nov 2020 00:59
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from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

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Hi Rob,
The MPG number is likely legit. My wife had a VW Jetta Turbodiesel and it did 50 MPG on a 50 mile journey, and that's US gallons. Unfortunately VW were cheating the emissions test, they got caught and the guvmint made them pay out a lot of money to the buyers or buy them back. It was such a good deal we gave it back. Its dual clutch automatic was brilliant too.
But we are giving Andrew an excuse for not getting on with his layout! Maybe we should start a Car Talk thread?
Andy
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615th message | this message only posted: 4 Nov 2020 01:08
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from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

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Andrew,
The bell-housing is the fat bit on the end of the gearbox/transmission where the clutch/torque-converter lives. Under heavy load the missing bolt could have wrecked the transmission and the engine crankcase. Ouch!
Andy
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616th message | this message only posted: 4 Nov 2020 01:14
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Just in case you’re beginning to rue the day I mentioned Alpina, here is reminder of what this thread used to be about. 

Over the weekend I got fed up with looking at the layout in it’s sorry half  taken apart state and temporarily reinstalled some of the scenery, platform, bridge and cattle dock and took snap to prove to myself, probably more than anyone, that I had made some really good progress earlier in the year. Found it quite encouraging!



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617th message | this message only posted: 4 Nov 2020 01:22
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from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester, United Kingdom



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Andrew,
Ah, back to railways. I have just been doing a stock check of my track making parts. For some reason I have over 6,500 Pandrol flat bottom baseplates - can't think what I got all those for :) Plenty of the proper BH stuff though so I won't need to lay awake at night wondering if I need to buy some more.

The picture of the bridge looks good, can't wait to see some more progress when you can get around to it.

Rob


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618th message | this message only posted: 4 Nov 2020 09:26
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from:
Hayfield
United Kingdom

 

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Andrew Duncan wrote: Hayfield wrote: With all the things going on at the moment its nice to have a diversion.Hello John
Yup agreed, and thanks or the pictures of the all the new lines from C&L. I take it these are extra sprues not replacing the parts being available separately as they have always been...?

Kind regards
Andrew
Andrew
These will be the standard sprues, you get 350 items per pack rather than 250, therefore the packs are priced accordingly.

The thing to remember is that the cost will be about neutral if you build turnouts, I do seem to get through quite a lot of bridge chairs and if I had J chairs this would also be similar, plus I am a bib fan of these fishplates. In the past when C&L sold the Exactoscale special chairs, these were dearer than normal chairs

For me it will get more folk thinking about what chair goes where rather than chopping up standard chairs. Phil is in the process of thinking about have a range of knuckle, elbow chairs and crossing nose chairs, It will be a universal style where items are cut to length. But a long way off and may not be feasible. I still find the Exactoscale switch, check, slip and obtuse chairs cover most aspects

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619th message | this message only posted: 23 Nov 2020 00:51
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Hello John
Sorry  for the late reply and thank you for the various explanations of the logic behind the changes

Here’s a small update of a bit of progress on the line under the station.
 
This is the copper paxolin rail support for the doorway bridge. This where trains leap into the air...  For some understanding of what I’m saying keep going....




And here it is installed in place on the end of the track bed already gapped ready to accept the rails that will be soldered to the copper

 



And here we are looking at the “precipice” with some track just laid in place to give the idea of what I’m doing or rather trying to do. 



That’s it for tonight. 
Kind regards 
Andrew

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620th message | this message only posted: 23 Nov 2020 06:04
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from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

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Hi Andrew,

I have done something similar and I also soldered brass tubes to the copper that accepted pieces of 1/8" diameter piano wire. They were inserted into the tubes to keep the rail aligned when the bridge was closed.

Cheers!
Andy
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621st message | this message only posted: 23 Nov 2020 11:26
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Phil O
Plymouth, United Kingdom



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Hi Andrew,

Something which may be of use to you, is to feed the tracks either side of the bridge from the bridge section, so that trains cannot take a nose dive if the bridge is out, ideally at least a foot either side of the gap.

Cheers

Phil.
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622nd message | this message only posted: 23 Nov 2020 12:28
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from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



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Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Another idea is the weighted flap on the end of the fixed board, which is pushed down when the bridge is dropped in place:



My graphics skills well in evidence there. :)

Martin.

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623rd message | this message only posted: 23 Nov 2020 18:25
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from:
Phil O
Plymouth, United Kingdom



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Martin,

I think Andrew would struggle to open the bridge with a 5 ton weight, assuming that the baseboard could take the weight, could it be an ACME weight? As per the Whiley Coyote and Roadrunner. 😄😄

Phil.
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624th message | this message only posted: 23 Nov 2020 20:41
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Andrew Barrowman wrote: Hi Andrew,

I have done something similar and I also soldered brass tubes to the copper that accepted pieces of 1/8" diameter piano wire. They were inserted into the tubes to keep the rail aligned when the bridge was closed.

Cheers!
Andy

Hello Andy

Yup good idea, and in fact I used the same approach when I had a lift type of fiddleyard, an Iain Rice design, although not perhaps one of his greatest.  It certainly needed a means of keeping the different levels aligned, and quite some strength and sense of balance to achieve a smooth transition from one level to the next.

In this instances however I think I'm going to rely a simple swing bridge with an adjustable stop(for lateral rail alignment), and with the far, unsupported end of the bridge,  held by a lip to keep the vertical levels correct. Not elegant but quite functionally effective. Having said that, it looks as though Martin and Phil have other ideas....?

Kind regards
Andrew


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625th message | this message only posted: 23 Nov 2020 23:35
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from:
Nigel Brown
 

 

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Best of luck, Andrew. I hate moveable track over gaps, from past experience. It's so easy for the gap to change...

Nigel

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626th message | this message only posted: 24 Nov 2020 03:12
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Martin Wynne wrote: Another idea is the weighted flap on the end of the fixed board, which is pushed down when the bridge is dropped in place:



My graphics skills well in evidence there. :)

Martin.

Hello Martin

Your graphic looks interesting but I’m not sure I follow it. Does the weight flip the bridge deck up into place that would otherwise be hanging down vertically?  Or have I got completely the wrong end of the stick 

Kind regards 

Andrew


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627th message | this message only posted: 24 Nov 2020 03:31
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Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Phil O wrote: Martin,

I think Andrew would struggle to open the bridge with a 5 ton weight, assuming that the baseboard could take the weight, could it be an ACME weight? As per the Whiley Coyote and Roadrunner. 😄😄

Phil.
Hello Phil

I’m afraid I’m not familiar with the Whiley Coyote, Roadrunner story, but yes a dead section either side of the bridge is going to be essential. Like your idea of feeding it from the bridge power. On my old Maiden Newton layout I had dead sections controlled by a couple of microswitches. Your idea will only require one switch per power district ( one UP, and one DOWN). Neat.

Kind regards 
Andrew 

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628th message | this message only posted: 24 Nov 2020 03:45
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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Nigel Brown wrote: Best of luck, Andrew. I hate moveable track over gaps, from past experience. It's so easy for the gap to change...

Nigel
Hello Nigel 
Yes I know what you mean, however  one of the great advantages of 00 and EM is the slop that allows a certain forgiveness that I understand / imagine P4 doesn’t. Don’t know how 3mm does in this regard, but it must be harder?

In the next few days I’ll take a photo of what I have in mind.
Kind regards 
Andrew 

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629th message | this message only posted: 24 Nov 2020 04:01
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from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

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Phil O wrote: Martin,

I think Andrew would struggle to open the bridge with a 5 ton weight, assuming that the baseboard could take the weight, could it be an ACME weight? As per the Whiley Coyote and Roadrunner. 😄😄

Objection!

It's Wiley (which, as it happens, is one of my middle names). :D

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Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



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Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Andrew Duncan wrote: Martin Wynne wrote:

 

Hello Martin

Your graphic looks interesting but I’m not sure I follow it. Does the weight flip the bridge deck up into place that would otherwise be hanging down vertically?  Or have I got completely the wrong end of the stick?
Hi Andrew,

You've got the wrong end of the stick, sorry I failed to make a proper drawing. It's not about how to make the bridge itself work, I assumed you have got that decided.

It's a safety device in response to Phil's suggestion about preventing trains falling off the layout when the bridge is not present.

The flap is a vertical piece of hardboard or somesuch, attached to the end face of the fixed baseboard on a pivot (loose screw/washer). When the bridge is removed, the flap flips up and physically blocks the end of the tracks. When the bridge is dropped into place, the flap gets pushed down out of the way.

The flap needs a small block of wood or whatever attached to it as a pusher-downer, which I omitted to draw. The top black blob is another screw or whatever to act as a stop in the up position.

You could use any sort of removable end plate on the baseboard, but the idea of the pivoted flap is that you can't forget to put it in place. 

Instead of the weight you could use a spring. But gravity is free, never breaks, and unlike a spring exerts a constant force.

p.s. I have just realised you intend a horizontal swing bridge, rather than a lifting bridge. Which means a bit of a design change on the flap, so that it can swing sideways out of the way. Or alternatively holding it down manually while you swing the bridge into position.

cheers,

Martin.

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631st message | this message only posted: 24 Nov 2020 09:02
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from:
Phil O
Plymouth, United Kingdom



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Andrew Duncan wrote: Phil O wrote: Martin,

I think Andrew would struggle to open the bridge with a 5 ton weight, assuming that the baseboard could take the weight, could it be an ACME weight? As per the Whiley Coyote and Roadrunner. 😄😄

Phil.
Hello Phil

I’m afraid I’m not familiar with the Whiley Coyote, Roadrunner story, but yes a dead section either side of the bridge is going to be essential. Like your idea of feeding it from the bridge power. On my old Maiden Newton layout I had dead sections controlled by a couple of microswitches. Your idea will only require one switch per power district ( one UP, and one DOWN). Neat.

Kind regards 
Andrew
Hi Andrew,

Here's a link to one, there are a few on Youtube, if you want to waste a few hours.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdKkI1vGsmE

Part of my misspent child/adulthood.

Phil.



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from:
Tony W
North Notts., United Kingdom

 

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Andrew Duncan wrote: Nigel Brown wrote: Best of luck, Andrew. I hate moveable track over gaps, from past experience. It's so easy for the gap to change...

Nigel
Hello Nigel 
Yes I know what you mean, however  one of the great advantages of 00 and EM is the slop that allows a certain forgiveness that I understand / imagine P4 doesn’t. Don’t know how 3mm does in this regard, but it must be harder?

In the next few days I’ll take a photo of what I have in mind.
Kind regards 
Andrew 

Hi Andrew.
This is an issue I have to face with my layout and the lifting flap / removable sections. I think you are correct that P4 tolerances are less forgiving of baseboard joint misalignment than OO and EM standards. One of the reasons for my using high quality pattern makers dowels to ensure consistent mating at the joints. I also have the issue of making sure a goodly length of track either side of the lifting flap is isolated when the draw bridge is up and there are several tracks involved at the lifting flap.

Regards
Tony.

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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Phil O wrote: Andrew Duncan wrote: Phil O wrote: Martin,

I think Andrew would struggle to open the bridge with a 5 ton weight, assuming that the baseboard could take the weight, could it be an ACME weight? As per the Whiley Coyote and Roadrunner. 😄😄

Phil.
Hello Phil

I’m afraid I’m not familiar with the Whiley Coyote, Roadrunner story, but yes a dead section either side of the bridge is going to be essential. Like your idea of feeding it from the bridge power. On my old Maiden Newton layout I had dead sections controlled by a couple of microswitches. Your idea will only require one switch per power district ( one UP, and one DOWN). Neat.

Kind regards 
Andrew
Hi Andrew,

Here's a link to one, there are a few on Youtube, if you want to waste a few hours.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdKkI1vGsmE

Part of my misspent child/adulthood.

Phil.


Hello Phil,
I am now educated...and after only 7 minutes. Wish my lessons at school had been this length....!

Andrew

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from:
Andrew Duncan
Reigate, United Kingdom



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Martin Wynne wrote: Andrew Duncan wrote: Martin Wynne wrote:

 

Hello Martin

Your graphic looks interesting but I’m not sure I follow it. Does the weight flip the bridge deck up into place that would otherwise be hanging down vertically?  Or have I got completely the wrong end of the stick?
Hi Andrew,

You've got the wrong end of the stick, sorry I failed to make a proper drawing. It's not about how to make the bridge itself work, I assumed you have got that decided.

It's a safety device in response to Phil's suggestion about preventing trains falling off the layout when the bridge is not present.

The flap is a vertical piece of hardboard or somesuch, attached to the end face of the fixed baseboard on a pivot (loose screw/washer). When the bridge is removed, the flap flips up and physically blocks the end of the tracks. When the bridge is dropped into place, the flap gets pushed down out of the way.

The flap needs a small block of wood or whatever attached to it as a pusher-downer, which I omitted to draw. The top black blob is another screw or whatever to act as a stop in the up position.

You could use any sort of removable end plate on the baseboard, but the idea of the pivoted flap is that you can't forget to put it in place. 

Instead of the weight you could use a spring. But gravity is free, never breaks, and unlike a spring exerts a constant force.

p.s. I have just realised you intend a horizontal swing bridge, rather than a lifting bridge. Which means a bit of a design change on the flap, so that it can swing sideways out of the way. Or alternatively holding it down manually while you swing the bridge into position.

cheers,

Martin.
Aaaah I see what you mean now Martin. Thank you. 
Kind regards 
Andrew

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