click here for a list of all existing Templot documentation
  Important Privacy Information cookie information pre-print options:    

 click image to open Templot Club in a new tab             Search           remove page highlighting
Templot club top logo
  looking for help ? -- -- --
looking for Templot? - (free)


enjoy using Templot? - 

 you are not logged in  - Login | Join

receive all messages by email: info


Recent Topics
Front Page  Search  Image Gallery  Gallery Upload  My Account  Members  SourceForge  TemplotMEC  Help  
make a donation  
please click: important information for new members and first-time visitors Templot Companion - User Guide
            messages archive on Yahoo
page trail:  Templot Club > Forums > Trackbuilding topics > 3D Printed Track and Turnouts
Templot web site

             Rating     3D Printed Track and Turnouts
  Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  Next Page Last Page      
 Start new topic   Reply blank   Printer friendly 
  Rate this topic  
AuthorMessage
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
761st message | this message only posted: 3 Dec 2018 18:36
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides
Thanks Andy,

The Proxxon is a great little saw for wood but the only time I tried cutting anything more serious the motor slowed down a lot and it didn't cope too well.

As you will have noticed the prices of pre-cut copper for sleepers has gone through the roof in recent years.

Rob


__________
message ref: 26275

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
762nd message | this message only posted: 3 Dec 2018 19:18
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides

Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Andrew Barrowman wrote:I have tried cutting laminate with a diamond blade and it's not a lot of fun. The dust is probably a bit dangerous too.Hi Andy,

Was that glass/epoxy laminate or SRBP*?

I found that cutting copper-clad SRBP laminate is not difficult with an ordinary HSS slitting saw. SRBP is not suitable for outdoor use, but perfectly satisfactory for most modelling.

It is also a lot cheaper:

 https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5-Pcs-Single-Side-Copper-Clad-Laminate-FR2-PCB-Circuit-Board-12x18cm-ae3d/231569072953

 http://www.jabdog.com/PCB-PCB.htm

*Synthetic-Resin Bonded Paper.

cheers,

Martin.

__________
message ref: 26276

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
763rd message | this message only posted: 3 Dec 2018 19:35
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
John Durbetaki
Gaston, Oregon USA



view images in gallery
view images as slides
The easy way to cut any clad board I have found to be a mini shear. I bought one at MicroMark ages ago - https://www.micromark.com/Mini-Metal-Shear-Brake

And there are also ones on ebay and other places.

With this method, the board is cut. I have also used it for thin aluminum, some plastics (not brittle) and even some thin wood.

John

__________
message ref: 26277

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
764th message | this message only posted: 4 Dec 2018 07:10
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
richard_t
Nr. Spalding, South Holland, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides
Thanks all for the PCB sleepers response!

Sorry Andrew, I didn't mean to drag this thread away from 3D printed track! Your old thread on the MERG forum was very helpful.

I've fitted the TCT (carbide) blade to my Proxxon mini table saw, and that's cut 100's of FR4 (glass-reinforced epoxy) PCBs from China. Fitted with some dust extraction, I don't get much dust from the top of the unit, although there is some inside that's left (but easily got rid off). The only trouble is the kerf, at around 1.1mm. I might try the diamond cutting disc, or the solid carbide blade, both of which are 0.5mm.

A proper PCB Guillotine (either this or this), is just out of budget at the moment.

Thanks

__________
message ref: 26279

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
765th message | this message only posted: 4 Dec 2018 20:40
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Trevor Walling
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Hello Andrew,
          Something like these might be a better option.Diamond cutting disk through a water bath. Should last a fair while and address the dust issue at the same time. https://www.google.com/search?q=electric+tile+cutter&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b
Regards.
Trevor.:)

__________
message ref: 26281

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
766th message | this message only posted: 5 Dec 2018 07:14
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Hayfield
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
The issues with these are the blades are quite thick, secondly difficult to get consistent widths.

Given the prices now charged for copperclad and Exactoscale's price decrease far better using plastic chairs and timbers, not including the hours saved cutting up the strips. If there is an odd job requiring copperclad buy a packet of precut strip
__________
message ref: 26282

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
767th message | this message only posted: 5 Dec 2018 08:11
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Stephen Freeman
Sandbach, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides
John is quite right, you'd probably lose about a sleeper width on each cut, besides which these machines tend to be a little messy to say the least, I know, I have one, only used for cutting tiles though (the diamond blades do not last that long either). Also of course not accurate enough for our needs.
__________
message ref: 26283

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
768th message | this message only posted: 10 Jul 2019 21:40
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Tom Allen
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
commercial laser cutting may be a cost effective method, the code would be really easy to produce by them and machine time would be low.
__________
message ref: 27213

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
769th message | this message only posted: 10 Jul 2019 21:49
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Tom Allen
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
With experience of a pla/filament printer i must admit i would shy away from it and lean quite heavily towards an sla/dlp resin printer. The quality will be better in every aspect and due to the way it exposes the resin a full screen of parts take no longer than one item. One drawback atm is the limited screen size (125 x 65mm) approx. But there are larger printers in the pipeline giving 250 x 130mm approx. One other "pro" is you can mix the resin with a flexible resin to give a more durable product, and of course have a wide variety of colours.
__________
message ref: 27214

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
770th message | this message only posted: 10 Jul 2019 22:38
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides

Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Tom Allen wrote: With experience of a pla/filament printer i must admit i would shy away from it and lean quite heavily towards an sla/dlp resin printer.Hi Tom,

Welcome to Templot Club. :)

I'm getting reasonable results from my filament printer in 7mm/ft scale, approaching the quality of injection moulding:

 

That's using a 0.6mm nozzle for the timbers and 0.2mm nozzle for the chairs. More info in this topic:

 http://85a.co.uk/forum/view_topic.php?id=3307&forum_id=1

which I now see is 12 months old. Where does the time go?

In 4mm/ft scale the results are more iffy, and I'm not entirely convinced it is worth continuing with integral chairs and timbers by this method:



But integral chairs and timbers is just one option. Printing a timber base with locations for separate chairs, resin printed perhaps, or Exactoscale-type pips for injection-moulded chairs, is another option. It certainly solves the assembly and rail-threading issues.

My aim is that Templot should produce files ready for 3D printing for typical home printers, which tend to be filament printers. To produce parts suitable for practical assembly by modellers, including the more complex track formations.

cheers,

Martin.

__________
message ref: 27215

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
771st message | this message only posted: 11 Jul 2019 08:34
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Tom Allen
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
You've certainly got your printer dialed in, those prints are pretty good for pla. DLP printers like the Anycubic Photon and the Epax X1 are retailing for around the £300 mark, and offer exceptional quality for such a small outlay. I have a Prusa I3 clone pla printer and only have the steppers running at the normal step setting, so i shall look into increasing the steps per to get the resolution better and do some experimenting.
PS. A massive thumbs up from me for the work you guys are doing here.:thumb::thumb::thumb:
__________
message ref: 27220

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
772nd message | this message only posted: 11 Jul 2019 08:45
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Tom Allen
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
At this point in time i'm waiting on a house move and all my tools and equipment are in storage, which is so frustrating. My fingers are actually itching to get back in the workshop and get started on my layout and a million ideas floating around my head.
__________
message ref: 27221

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
773rd message | this message only posted: 28 Sep 2019 08:46
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Tom Allen
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
by chance has anyone got a good 3d drawing of a three hole rail chair i could buy. Or even better a cad drawing of one.
__________
message ref: 27889

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
774th message | this message only posted: 13 Jan 2020 03:37
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Andrew Barrowman wrote: Some recent 3D prints. These are in H00-DN gauge (other gauges in Templot).

I uploaded them to the Gallery but I can't seem to figure out how to Insert them into the message.

(Using Chrome on Windows10.)

edit: Now resolved Using FireFox











Decisions, decisions, decisions.

After a lot of mucking around building sheds and the like I'm trying to actually get on with building my layout. Let me assure you it won't be appearing as "Railway of the Month" in any publications. My idea of the perfect model railway is pretty much an overblown trainset.

I happened upon the turnout (pic above) that it seems I printed four years ago and I have to admit I was somewhat impressed by just how good it is. It's not injection moulding quality of course but a casual observer might not notice the difference. As long as all the bits stay in gauge it's good enough for me.

The snag is I can't quite remember how I made it! I think I have located the model files but I'm not sure how my printer was configured. Might need to do some archeology.

__________
message ref: 28863

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
775th message | this message only posted: 13 Jan 2020 18:34
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Trevor Walling
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Hello,
This not remembering stuff seems to get worse the older one gets.At least you managed to print something. I set my 3d printer up some time when and still have to actually print something. At least the cover I put over it has stopped it getting dusty.
Regards.:D
__________
message ref: 28864

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
776th message | this message only posted: 15 Apr 2020 05:00
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Up until recently my 3D printer was in the "office" but recently I relocated it to my workshop/railway-shed where it is attached to a laptop. The laptop seems to be a bit faster than my PC but the display wasn't much use for any sort of CAD. That has been resolved with the acquisition of a hi-res monitor which is a major improvement. Not bad for $60.

When I left off I wasn't too happy with the mechanical aspects of the chairs and I've been working to make them more robust and also support the rail a bit better. That seems to be going quite well.

Previously I was using a 0.2mm nozzle on the printer. It does produce small features like bolt heads better than larger nozzles but it takes a long time to print a turnout. To that end I've been experimenting with a 0.4 mm nozzle to see how "bad" it really is. It's actually pretty good - or at least good enough for me - and it is much, much faster.

I'm printing with PLA/PHA and the prints are nice and crisp. PLA/PHA is a lot tougher than pure PLA too, the only snag is it's shiny black but that's not really a problem as the track will be painted. There is a less shiny version available. I might give it a shot when the current spool is nearing the end.

The other day I realized there is a much faster way of generating the chairs required for a turnout of just about any size. In the past I was generating models in CAD for all the crossing chairs required for a particular crossing angle. There are a lot of chairs for each angle and a large number of possible angles. It quickly becomes a bit depressing.

But when you get right down to it what matters is that the jaws grip and support the rails at the desired angle and the chair base is correctly aligned with the timber. The solution is to position two blocks at the appropriate position on the timber. One block is the chair jaws and the other block is the chair base. The jaws are then aligned with the rail while the base is aligned with the timber.

There is no need to combine both blocks into a single block. The printer software takes care of that. I realize that the result isn't exactly like the prototype but I doubt if that will be detectable at 1:76.2  It certainly won't bother me.

Once I think I have a satisfactory mechanical jaw model I'll make some cosmetic adjustments and hopefully crank out a lot of turnouts. But I've said that before :D

__________
message ref: 29336

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
777th message | this message only posted: 17 Apr 2020 04:09
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Making some progress. "JawTest12" performs well. The rails slide in with little force and the jaws grip the rails with just enough pressure to maintain gauge and vertical alignment (I was having problems with that in the past). They are also very robust - certainly much more robust that my previous attempts. I'll do some destructive testing when I have a lot of samples.

They are a bit overscale but not too much. I might be able to make a few adjustments to improve their appearance without compromising the mechanical integrity but I think I'll print and test some turnout bases before I attempt to do that. At the moment I'm more interested in function and repeatability rather than pure form. It's also quite simple to make adjustments to the jaw design and automatically apply them to all future prints.

I was having a problem with stray filament fouling the jaws but I discovered the slicer was not retracting the filament as it moved across the jaws. Easily fixed once you know where to look.

The latest slicer software helps a lot too. It has "adaptive slicing" which automatically varies layer thickness to best fit the contours of the 3D model. That means the rectangular timbers are printed with the thickest possible layers which reduces their print time while the chairs are printed with thinner layers which makes them a closer approximation to the model. It was possible to do that manually before but it entailed quite a lot of work.

__________
message ref: 29347

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
778th message | this message only posted: 30 Apr 2020 05:53
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
This one is probably for Martin :D

I had assumed that changing the curvature of a particular turnout size would alter the distances between the chairs on the timbers but based on a not exactly scientific analysis it seems that may not be true in all cases.

If a modeller is placing timbers and discrete chairs on a template this is more than likely a moot point but if one happens to be printing chairs integral with timbers this might allow a significant reduction in the number of 3D models required to construct a turnout with a particular type of switch and crossing angle.

It might be possible to print all the timbers complete with chairs regardless of the curvature and glue them to a template. It might even be possible to print a complete "flexible" turnout base with a single web down the middle (although I'm not sure the geometry will hold up properly in that case.)

__________
message ref: 29460

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
779th message | this message only posted: 30 Apr 2020 19:34
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Rob Manchester
Manchester, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides
Hi Andrew,

Hope you are keeping well. Here is the Tillig HO approach to flexible turnout bases.


I used them many years ago and they assemble well although they were a little fragile. No sure if you could use the wavy web design in a material suited to 3D printing.

Rob


__________
message ref: 29465

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
780th message | this message only posted: 30 Apr 2020 20:08
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Hi Rob,
We've managed to avoid the lurgi so far. I'm spending a lot of time in the shed.

Thanks for posting that. I think the wavy webs should be possible with 3D printing. I'm using PLA/PHA which is quite tough and flexible. I have not managed to break any chairs when inserting the rails in quite a while.

Cheers!
Andy
Rob Manchester wrote: Hi Andrew,

Hope you are keeping well. Here is the Tillig HO approach to flexible turnout bases.


I used them many years ago and they assemble well although they were a little fragile. No sure if you could use the wavy web design in a material suited to 3D printing.

Rob



__________
message ref: 29466

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
781st message | this message only posted: 30 Apr 2020 20:24
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides

Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Hi Andy, Rob,

I tried flexible webbing:



That design was intended to make them more accessible for cutting away before ballasting, than having them under the rails. Also the angle makes it possible for the thickness of a knife blade to flex the web away from the timber without disrupting the position of the timber.

In practice they proved far too flexible (in toughened PLA), and difficult to hold in line while threading rail. Sorry no photos, it all went in the bin. :(

cheers,

Martin.

__________
message ref: 29467

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
782nd message | this message only posted: 30 Apr 2020 22:40
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides

Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Andrew Barrowman wrote: This one is probably for Martin :D

I had assumed that changing the curvature of a particular turnout size would alter the distances between the chairs on the timbers but based on a not exactly scientific analysis it seems that may not be true in all cases.

If a modeller is placing timbers and discrete chairs on a template this is more than likely a moot point but if one happens to be printing chairs integral with timbers this might allow a significant reduction in the number of 3D models required to construct a turnout with a particular type of switch and crossing angle.

It might be possible to print all the timbers complete with chairs regardless of the curvature and glue them to a template. It might even be possible to print a complete "flexible" turnout base with a single web down the middle (although I'm not sure the geometry will hold up properly in that case.)
Hi Andy,

If all the chaired timbers are prepared for a given turnout size, say a B-8 with a regular V-crossing, then yes that set of timbers can be used on a curved version of the turnout template, curved to any radius within reason.

This assumes there is no change in the design, such as changing to a curviform V-crossing, or changing from square-on to equalized timbering.

Whether that set of timbers can be webbed together and flexed to fit a curved template is more problematic.

In a curved turnout on the prototype, the lead length is maintained constant along the flatter of the two crossing rails. In most cases that is the main-road crossing rail, but not always. In other words the curving line runs along that rail, so a single web running under that rail would be needed in the 3D print.

However, Templot curves templates along the centre-line of the main-road, so that's where a single line of webs would be needed to match a 3D printed base to a Templot curved template.

The reason Templot does it that way is to make the geometry 10 times more straightforward in creating curved crossovers and other curved formations.

Right from the start I have had my own development versions of Templot which allow the curving line to be placed anywhere, including under the crossing rails in prototype fashion. Or any other rail. I have never made them public because I just can't face trying to explain the user interface for them, and all the error messages which pop up if you get it wrong and mix up templates having the curving line in the wrong place. Especially if you insert a turnout in a transition curve.

On the main program panel, see the program > expert > curving method > menu options.

I don't know if this answers your question?

cheers,

Martin.

__________
message ref: 29470

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
783rd message | this message only posted: 30 Apr 2020 23:52
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Thanks very much Martin. That does answer my question.

I've been taking some measurements from various templates after I imported them into TurboCAD and it looks like a web down the middle will work for reasonable amounts of curving. I'll probably add at least one more web to hold everything "square" and snip it out if I want to curve the turnout.

I tried a quick test with a web down the middle and it seems to be flexible and strong enough. The web is 1.8 mm wide by 0.3 mm thick.

My "library" of chair types is now complete from a mechanical perspective but I still need to add some cosmetics. I've settled on a 0.3 mm nozzle. It gives me an acceptable amount of detail without taking too long to print a turnout - that's around one hour at the moment. I might be able to speed it up a bit but I'll hold off on that until I've printed a lot more bases.

I suppose I better finish the layout design now :D

Cheers!
Andy

__________
message ref: 29472

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
784th message | this message only posted: 8 May 2020 05:18
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Aaargh!

I am awash in point bases. (Mostly B 7.5)

I wanted to make sure I could reliably print a turnout base without having to mind the printer. That worked for a few prints then things started to go awry. On some prints the first layer was too thin in certain areas.

I'm printing on a heated glass bed. The glass is quite flat (I checked) but the way the printing surface is supported on my cheapo printer is slightly odd. The bed is supported on three bearings but the print surface is supported at four corners, all of which are adjustable. It's now supported at three points which makes it a lot simpler to get the bed level. I think the bed heater was also tending to warp the glass but I think I've solved that now.

My "impressionist" chairs now include suggestions of bolts (a bit tricky with a 0.3 mm printer nozzle) and they are gripping the rail just about right. I think I might need to tweak the reference point of the jaws very slightly as the prints seem to be slightly over-gauge but they are quite usable as is.

I'll post some pics once I get them installed, painted and ballasted.

A

__________
message ref: 29581

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
785th message | this message only posted: 8 May 2020 07:31
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Hayfield
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Andy

How about a photo in the raw as well please
__________
message ref: 29582

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
786th message | this message only posted: 8 May 2020 17:22
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Hayfield wrote: Andy

How about a photo in the raw as well please

Hi John,

I think I'll wait until I can show it alongside one that's wearing its makeup. They don't look very appealing in the raw - at least not the way they come out in my photographs  :)

Cheers!
Andy

__________
message ref: 29587

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
787th message | this message only posted: 8 May 2020 22:36
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
In the meantime here's an image of the model produced by MS 3D Builder after it corrected the STL file produced by TurboCAD.



__________
message ref: 29591

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
788th message | this message only posted: 9 May 2020 07:19
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Hayfield
United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Andrew

On a home printer what would these cost to produce please, and are the chairs representations rather than scale items
__________
message ref: 29594

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
789th message | this message only posted: 9 May 2020 22:52
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Hi John,

Well, if it was your home printer, as the amount of filament consumed in printing a single 1:76 chair is very small they would cost practically nothing. Just time and the amortized cost of the printer of course.

But why would you only print the chairs when you could print the timbers complete with the chairs? Even then the material cost is still peanuts.

What comes out of the printer is actually very close to these models. They are close to scale but the dimensions and details are modified to make them printable and strong enough to not break when the rails are inserted. The check rails and wing rails are not pre-formed. These chairs are strong enough to bend the rail as it's inserted. (I'm using SMP rail which is a bit under-scale in width.)

Cheers!
Andy



Hayfield wrote: Andrew

On a home printer what would these cost to produce please, and are the chairs representations rather than scale items


__________
message ref: 29600

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
790th message | this message only posted: 10 May 2020 03:16
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Here it is with the rails inserted but unpainted alongside a copy with no rails. The surface of the plastic is very glossy which makes it difficult to see what's going on and it's not very realistic.




Here's the same thing after I applied a quick coat of rattle-can paint. I don't think it looks very different from the 3D rendering I posted above. The only slightly expensive bits are the rails :D




__________
message ref: 29601

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
791st message | this message only posted: 10 May 2020 21:57
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides

Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Hi Andy,

That's looking very good. :thumb:

On RMweb you said 'If anyone wants to "play-along" at home let me know and I'll post the STL file'.

Yes please -- I'd like to try them on my Bibo printer. :)

You can attach STL files directly here. (And link to your post here from RMweb if you wish).

p.s. must be .stl lower-case.

cheers,

Martin.

__________
message ref: 29610

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
792nd message | this message only posted: 10 May 2020 22:32
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Hi Martin,

Here it is. MS 3D builder fixed it but made the file quite a bit larger in the process.

Cheers!
Andy


Martin Wynne wrote: Hi Andy,

That's looking very good. :thumb:

On RMweb you said 'If anyone wants to "play-along" at home let me know and I'll post the STL file'.

Yes please -- I'd like to try them on my Bibo printer. :)

You can attach STL files directly here. (And link to your post here from RMweb if you wish).

p.s. must be .stl lower-case.

cheers,

Martin.


__________
message ref: 29611
Attachment: B7dot5L6pW.stl (Downloaded 25 times)
 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
793rd message | this message only posted: 10 May 2020 22:51
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides

Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Andrew Barrowman wrote: Here it is. MS 3D builder fixed it but made the file quite a bit larger in the process.Many thanks Andy. :)

Loaded fine in Simplify3D:



I first need to sort out the slicing -- I have 0.6mm and 0.2mm nozzles currently installed -- it will be extremely slow if I do it all with the 0.2mm, but the chairs won't look good done with the 0.6mm.

I have a 0.3mm nozzle which I could use, but changing them is a lot of faff because the two must be exactly level with each other, even if intending to use only one of them. I'm tempted to order spare hot bars for easier swapping:


linked from https://ae01.alicdn.com/kf/HTB15IXXFrPpK1RjSZFFq6y5PpXaY.jpg_480x480q90.jpg

Thanks again.

cheers,

Martin.

__________
message ref: 29612

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
794th message | this message only posted: 10 May 2020 23:01
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Martin,

I used a 0.3mm nozzle and a "height table" but it still takes a long time to print - around 75 minutes. But I've managed to get my printer to be very repeatable so I can launch it and leave it.

A
__________
message ref: 29613

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
795th message | this message only posted: 10 May 2020 23:11
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides

Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Andrew Barrowman wrote: Martin,

I used a 0.3mm nozzle and a "height table" but it still takes a long time to print - around 75 minutes. But I've managed to get my printer to be very repeatable so I can launch it and leave it.
Hi Andy,

And a "height table" is ...? Different layer thicknesses at different levels?

75 minutes doesn't sound too long to me, if it can be left running. It will take me a lot longer than that to find some SMP rail ... :)

Thanks again.

Martin.

__________
message ref: 29614

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
796th message | this message only posted: 10 May 2020 23:29
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Martin,

Yes Slic3r allows you to specify heights for a ranges of height limits. (It also has adaptive slicing which takes a best guess at the layer thicknesses.)

I maximize the timber layers then drop down to 0.15mm for the chairs.

A
__________
message ref: 29615

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
797th message | this message only posted: 11 May 2020 00:15
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Martin Wynne
West Of The Severn, United Kingdom



view images in gallery
view images as slides

Please do not send requests for help direct to me via email or PM.

Post your questions on the forum where everyone can see them and add helpful replies.
Andrew Barrowman wrote: Yes Slic3r allows you to specify heights for a ranges of height limits. (It also has adaptive slicing which takes a best guess at the layer thicknesses.)

I maximize the timber layers then drop down to 0.15mm for the chairs.
Thanks Andy.

Yes, S3D can do the same, although I haven't yet gone fully into it:

 https://www.simplify3d.com/support/articles/different-settings-for-different-regions-of-a-model/

My method so far has been to create separate .gcode files for the timbers (0.6mm nozzle), and the chairs (0.2mm nozzle). It does mean attending to the printer mid-way through printing to re-start it. But if it's repeatable, it's easy to set a timer to remind me. The Bibo beeps when it gets to the end of a file, but not very loud. There is also a gcode BEEP command -- I could insert a few dozen of them. But I might add an extra microswitch at the home position for the head to ring a loud bell. :)

gcode is plain text, so in theory I could simply append them into a single file. I tend to edit them in Notepad++ anyway.

cheers,

Martin.

__________
message ref: 29616

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
798th message | this message only posted: 11 May 2020 00:45
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Andrew Barrowman
USA

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Martin,

You'll have noticed there are three webs. The idea is that for a curved turnout the outer webs can be cut or removed while the center web maintains the timber spacing. I tried it without the outer webs but I added them in again as it makes it a lot easier to thread the rails.

I also made a sort of reamer from a short length of rail. It's pointy at the front with vertical scratches on the rail web. I push it through the chars to clear any stray filament before I insert the rail.

Scuse shorthand. I'm on a Kindle.

A
__________
message ref: 29617

 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
799th message | this message only posted: 11 May 2020 08:59
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Charles Orr
Leicester, United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
Hi both,

I've done a quick trial print using Simplify3D  and a Prusa Mk3 with a 0.2mm nozzle.

No effort to tweak anything.  Red PLA was on the printer.

I've got some C&L bullhead rail here but I don't think I can fit the rail on this  print but I will have a go.

If either of you produce a tweaked file either using Simplify3D or the Prusa Slicer I'd be very interested  i

in trying it out.

Cheers

Charles



__________
message ref: 29618
Attachment: track.jpg (Downloaded 26 times)
 
 Clicked a link? Wrong message? Wait until the page has finished loading, click in the address bar and then press the Enter key. This is a timing bug in some browsers.
800th message | this message only posted: 11 May 2020 09:24
 PM  Reply with quote  Reply blank 
from:
Charles Orr
Leicester, United Kingdom

 

view images in gallery
view images as slides
My mistake it's a 0.4mm nozzle, the layer height is 0.2mm.
__________
message ref: 29619

 
This is topic ID = 2734     Page created at 03:38 (local time) Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  Next Page Last Page    
You can type a quick reply to this topic here.

Click in the box to begin.


But to reply to an individual message, or to include images, attachments and formatted text, use the reply buttons on each message above.

To start a new topic in this forum, click the Start new topic button below.
To start a new topic in a different forum, click the Forum Jump drop-down list below.

             Start new topic 

 click to jump to a different forum:     Back to top of page

Templot Club > Forums > Trackbuilding topics > 3D Printed Track and Turnouts
about Templot Club

list recently active topics Templot Companion - User Guide - A-Z Index Templot Explained for beginners Please click: important information for new members and first-time visitors.
indexing link for search engines

back to top of page


Please read this important note about copyright: Unless stated otherwise, all the files submitted to this web site are copyright and the property of the respective contributor. You are welcome to use them for your own personal non-commercial purposes, and in your messages on this web site. If you want to publish any of this material elsewhere or use it commercially, you must first obtain the owner's permission to do so.

The small print: All material submitted to this web site is the responsibility of the respective contributor. By submitting material to this web site you acknowledge that you accept full responsibility for the material submitted. The owner of this web site is not responsible for any content displayed here other than his own contributions. The owner of this web site may edit, modify or remove any content at any time without giving notice or reason.
Problems with this web site? Contact webmaster@templot.com.   This web site uses cookies: click for information.  
© 2020  

Powered by UltraBB - © 2009 Data 1 Systems